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Biodiversity loss is one major outcome of human-mediated ecosystem disturbance. One way that humans have triggered wildlife declines is by transporting disease-causing agents to remote areas of the world. Amphibians have been hit particularly hard by disease due in part to a globally distributed pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis [Bd]). Prior research has revealed important insights into the biology and distribution of Bd; however, there are still many outstanding questions in this system. Although we know that there are multiple divergent lineages of Bd that differ in pathogenicity, we know little about how these lineages are distributed around the world and where lineages may be coming into contact. Here, we implement a custom genotyping method for a global set of Bd samples. This method is optimized to amplify and sequence degraded DNA from noninvasive skin swab samples. We describe a divergent lineage of Bd, which we call BdASIA3, that appears to be widespread in Southeast Asia. This lineage co-occurs with the global panzootic lineage (BdGPL) in multiple localities. Additionally, we shed light on the global distribution of BdGPL and highlight the expanded range of another lineage, BdCAPE. Finally, we argue that more monitoring needs to take place where Bd lineages are coming into contact and where we know little about Bd lineage diversity. Monitoring need not use expensive or difficult field techniques but can use archived swab samples to further explore the history—and predict the future impacts—of this devastating pathogen.


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land system science axiomatically addresses social–environmental systems by integrating the dynamics of land uses (social) and land covers (environment), invariably including the use of remote sensing data and often, spatially explicit models of land change. This kind of research is illustrated through the Southern Yucatán Peninsular Region project (1997–2008) aimed at understanding, predicting, and projecting spatially explicit land change in a region with juxtaposed land uses-agriculture and a biosphere reserve. The successes of the project, its contributions to contemporary land system science, and the organizational mechanisms that fostered the research are identified as well as various corrections, which if applied, may have refined and extended the project's goals. Overall, the project demonstrates the kind of integrated research required to advance understanding of a social-environment system and the team-based methods used in the process.


Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Land system science axiomatically addresses social– environmental systems by integrating the dynamics of land uses (social) and land covers (environment), invariably including the use of remote sensing data and often, spatially explicit models of land change. This kind of research is illustrated through the Southern Yucata´ n Peninsular Region project (1997–2008) aimed at understanding, predicting, and projecting spatially explicit land change in a region with juxtaposed land uses-agriculture and a biosphere reserve. The successes of the project, its contributions to contemporary land system science, and the organizational mechanisms that fostered the research are identified as well as various corrections, which if applied, may have refined and extended the project’s goals. Overall, the project demonstrates the kind of integrated research required to advance understanding of a social-environment system and the team-based methods used in the process.


4.
Libro
Integrated land-change science and tropical deforestation in the Southern Yucatán: final frontiers / edited by B. L. Turner II, Jacqueline Geoghegan and David R. Foster
Turner II, Billie Lee (editor) ; Geoghegan, Jacqueline (editora) ; Foster, David R. (editor) ;
Oxford, England, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press , 2004
Clasificación: Y/333.75137 / I5
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Chetumal , San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040002406 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030000902 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010000042 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This highly topical study of tropical deforestation in Mexico reports on the first phase of the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change in the Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region Project (LCLUC-SYPR): a large, multi-institutional, and team-based study designed to understand and project land changes in a development frontier that pits the rapidly growing needs of smallholder farmers to cut down forests for cultivation against federally sponsored initiatives committed to various international programmes of forest preservation and complementary economic programmes. The SYPR project is a response to inderdisciplinary defined research themes deemed critical to global environmental change and complementary international research agendas (e.g. environment and development, ecosystem assessment, biotic diversity). Pivotal among these agendas are those posed by the Land-Use/Cover Change (LUCC) effort of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and the International Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change Programme as it is linked through such US sponsors as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The themes (i.e. questions and subjects) posed by these programmes and organization are 'integrated' or 'synthesis' in kind, meaning that they rest within the intersection of formal disciplines and are intended to fit into a larger, systems framework about human-environment relationships and the structure and function of the biosphere. The editors of this volume, as most of its contributors, come from the disciplines of geography, ecology, and economics. The lead editor, the geographer B. L. Turner II, has spent most of his career in pursuit of understanding different aspects of tropical deforestation and agriculture.

Índice

1. Introduction Three Frontiers of the Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region and SYPR Project
I: Human-Environment Relationships, 1000 BC - AD 1900
2. The Long View: Human-Environment Relationships 1000 BC - AD 1900
3. Forest Extraction to Theme Parks: The Modern History of Land Change
II: Land-Cover Characteristics and Change
4. Forest Types and their Implications
5. Recovery of Nutrient Cycling and Ecosystem Properties following Swidden Cultivation: Regional and Stand-Level Constraints
6. Land Cover and Land Use: Classification and Change Analysis
III: Agents and Institutions of Land Change: Household Economy and Cultivation
7. Institutions, Organizations, and Policy Affecting Land Change: Complexity Within and Beyond the Ejido
8. The Ejido Household: The Current Agent of Change
9. Subsistence Sustained: Swidden or Milpa Cultivation
10. Jalapeno Pepper Cultivation: Emergent Commercial Land Use
11. The Semi-Market and Semi-Subsistence Household: The Evidence and Test of Smallholder Behavior
IV: Spatial Modeling of Land Change: Empirical Approaches in Data-Sparse Environments
12. Spatially Explicit, Statistical Land-Change Models in Data-Sparse Conditions
13. The SYPR Integrative Assessment Model: Complexity in Development
Retrospective: The Three Frontiers Revisited
Glossary and Acronyms
Index