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3 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Wasserman, Michael D.
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The foraging activity of many organisms reveal strategic movement patterns, showing efficient use of spatially distributed resources. The underlying mechanisms behind these movement patterns, such as the use of spatial memory, are topics of considerable debate. To augment existing evidence of spatial memory use in primates, we generated movement patterns from simulated primate agents with simple sensory and behavioral capabilities. We developed agents representing various hypotheses of memory use, and compared the movement patterns of simulated groups to those of an observed group of red colobus monkeys (Procolobus rufomitratus), testing for: the effects of memory type (Euclidian or landmark based), amount of memory retention, and the effects of social rules in making foraging choices at the scale of the group (independent or leader led). Our results indicate that red colobus movement patterns fit best with simulated groups that have landmark based memory and a follow the leader foraging strategy. Comparisons between simulated agents revealed that social rules had the greatest impact on a group’s step length, whereas the type of memory had the highest impact on a group’s path tortuosity and cohesion. Using simulation studies as experimental trials to test theories of spatial memory use allows the development of insight into the behavioral mechanisms behind animal movement, developing case-specific results, as well as general results informing how changes to perception and behavior influence movement patterns.


2.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Forest-dwelling mammals such as primates could be particularly vulnerable to habitat fragmentation; however, the defi nition and quantifi cation of fragmentation have varied considerably among studies. This has resulted in contradictions and thus results are diffi cult to interpret and compare. To encourage a consistent and more precise use of the term “habitat fragmentation,” we reviewed 100 fragmentation studies on primates to quantify how fragmentation effects are assessed. We advocate that habitat fragmentation is a landscape-scale process that involves both loss and the breaking apart of habitat. Hence, independently analyzing both effects is necessary to assess the effects of the breaking apart of habitat while controlling for habitat loss (fragmentation per se). This needs to be done through landscape- scale studies (that is, using landscapes as the independent unit of observation); however, fragmentation studies on primates are typically at the single fragment scale, often with a single continuous forest used for comparison. We suggest that primate responses at the fragment scale can vary dramatically in landscapes with different habitat amounts and confi gurations. In this review we provide clear and consistent terminology to help future studies to accurately assess the effects of fragmentation on primates and to help to form a body of literature where comparisons among studies are possible?.


3.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje