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8 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Winterton, Peter
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1.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The introduction of species into new ecosystems, especially in small and isolated regions such as islands, offers an excellent opportunity to answer questions of the evolutionary processes occurring in natural conditions on a scale that could never be achieved in laboratory conditions. In this study, we examined the Mexican red rump tarantula Brachypelma vagans Ausserer (Mygalomorphae: Theraphosidae), a species that was introduced to Cozumel Island, Mexico, 40 years ago. This introduction provides an exceptional model to study effects such as morphological variation between island populations and those on the mainland in open habitats facing the island. Intraspecific variation related to the color polymorphism was compared. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotypic differences between continental populations of B. vagans and the introduced population on Cozumel Island. Phenotypic difference was evaluated using two approaches: 1) comparison of the morphometric measurements of adult and juvenile individuals at the local scale and between continental and island populations, and 2) comparison of individual color polymorphism between mainland and island populations. Two locations were sampled within the continental part of the Yucatan peninsula and two on the island of Cozumel. The number of samples analyzed at each site was 30 individuals. The morphometric results showed significant differences between continental and island populations, with bigger individuals on the island. In addition, three new variations of the typical color pattern of B. vagans recorded so far were observed. This study opens the door to further investigations to elucidate the origin of the phenotypic variation of the isolated individuals on Cozumel Island. Also, the widest range of color morphs found for a tarantula species is reported.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Potential distributional patterns of three wild ungulate species in a fragmented tropical region of northeastern Mexico
Vilchis Nestor, Claudia Andrea ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (coaut.) ; Barriga Sosa, Irene de los Ángeles (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Tropical Conservation Science Vol. 6, no. 4 (September 2013), p. 539-557 ISSN: 1940-0829
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Se analizaron los patrones de distribución potencial de tres especies nativas de ungulados: Odocoileus virginianus, Mazama temama y Pecari tajacu, en el bosque tropical más septentrional de América en el este de México, en respuesta a diferentes variables físicas, climáticas, biológicas y antropogénicas, para identificar factores ambientales relacionados con su distribución potencial y áreas potenciales clave para la conservación de ungulados. Se obtuvieron registros actuales de presencia para cada especie y se construyeron modelos de distribución potencial utilizando el modelo de nicho ecológico de máxima entropía. Las superficies de adecuabilidad del modelo fueron utilizadas para calcular el hábitat potencial remanente en la región, así como el área potencial de simpatría y la representatividad de éstas en Áreas Naturales Protegidas. Las variables biológicas y antropogénicas predijeron mejor la distribución para las tres especies. La composición del paisaje (proporción de diferentes clases de uso del suelo: bosque, agricultura, agostadero) en un área aproximada de 120 ha, fue la variable más importante para todos los modelos, influyendo diferente a cada especie en relación a la tolerancia de éstas a hábitats alterados. El área potencial remanente para las tres especies parece estar fragmentada y casi eliminada en las áreas de planicie (<14% remanente).

Los modelos de distribución nos permitieron detectar una superficie importante en la parte occidental del área de estudio que posiblemente podría funcionar como un gran corredor biológico que promueve la conectividad en la provincia mastgeográfica de la Sierra Madre Oriental en una región altamente transformada por cambios de uso de suelo. Bajo este contexto de transformación de hábitat, el manejo enfocado a fomentar una matriz de calidad a nivel de paisaje, promete ser una alternativa viable para la conservación de ungulados en regiones tropicales de México.

Resumen en inglés

In the northernmost American tropical forests of eastern Mexico, we analyzed the potential distribution of three ungulate species, Odocoileus virginianus, Mazama temama and Pecari tajacu, in response to several physical, climatic, biological, and anthropogenic variables, in order to identify environmental factors affecting distribution and potential key areas for ungulate conservation. Current presence records for these species were gathered, and potential distribution models were built using Maximum Entropy niche modeling (MaxEnt). Model suitability surfaces were used to calculate remaining potential habitat areas in the region, as well as the potential sympatric area and representation of these areas in Natural Protected Areas. Biological and anthropogenic variables were the best species distribution predictors. Landscape composition (the proportion of different land-use and land-cover classes: forest, agriculture, and pasture) within approximately 120 ha, was the most important variable for all models, influencing each species differently with respect to their tolerance of altered habitats. The remaining potential area of all three species is fragmented and has apparently been nearly lost in plains (<14% remaining). Distribution models allowed us to detect an important location in the western portion of our study area which may function as a large biological corridor in the Sierra Madre Oriental mastogeographic province, a region heavily transformed by land use change. In the context of habitat transformation, management promoting quality matrix at the landscape level promises to be a viable alternative for ungulate conservation in tropical regions of Mexico.


3.
Artículo
A case of zootherapy with the tarantula Brachypelma vagans Ausserer, 1875 in traditional medicine of the Chol Mayan ethnic group in Mexico
Machkour M'Rabet, Salima ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Rojo, Roberto (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine Vol. 7, no. 12 (Mar 2011), p. 1-7 ISSN: 1746-4269
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

BACKGROUND: In practically every human culture, the use of arthropods as medicinal resources has been reported. In Mexico, the Mayan people mainly use plants but occasionally also animals and minerals in their medicine. This article is the first to report the traditional use of the tarantula Brachypelma vagans by medicine men in the Chol community, an ancient indigenous group that inhabits the southeastern part of Mexico. We also describe the utility of such arachnids in traditional medicine. METHODS: This study was carried out in different Chol communities in the states of Chiapas and Campeche (southeastern Mexico) from 2003 until 2007. We interviewed the local medicine men, patients and non-Chol people in each village visited to collect information about the rituals involved and the effectiveness of this traditional medicine and also their opinion of this traditional medicine. RESULTS: In all independent villages, the people who present an illness called 'aire de tarantula' or tarantula wind with symptoms including chest pain, coughing and asthma, were treated by the medicine man (called 'hierbatero') with a tarantula-based beverage. From village to village, the beverage has a similar base composition but some variations occur in additional ingredients depending on the individual medicine man. Like in all traditional Mayan medicine, the ritual of the ceremony consists of drinking the tarantula-based beverage and this is principally accompanied by chants and burning of incense. CONCLUSIONS: The recipe of the tarantula-based beverage and the procedure of this ritual ceremony were fairly constant in all the villages visited. Our work shows that despite the tarantula's bad image in several cultures, in others positive use is made of these spiders, as in modern medicine.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Activities and social interactions in captive Antillean manatees in Mexico
Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Becerra López, Sylvia P. (coaut.) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (coaut.) ; Morales Vela, José Benjamín (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Delfour, Fabbiene (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/599.55097267 / A2
Contenido en: Mammalia Vol. 74, no. 2 (June 2010), p. 141-146 ISSN: 0025-1461
Bibliotecas: Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030007165 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Behavioural research in endangered manatees is essential for successful conservation management. We examined the activities and social interactions of a captive group of Antillean manatees located in the Dolphin Discovery Park in Mexico. The group studied was composed of two adults, one subadult and one calf. We determined activity patterns and space use of the manatees in a natural water pool over a daytime period and a night-time period. The behavioural strategies of the manatees included (1) during the day, mainly foraging, feeding, and remaining inactive, and (2) evening activities were divided among social interaction, environment exploration, and resting activities. All the behaviour patterns of the captive manatees seemed to be influenced by the feeding schedule during the day. The number of contacts between manatees increased strongly at night, each individual having a preferred partner for social interaction. The cow-calf dyad showed the highest intensity of contacts, whereas subadults showed the lowest. The relationships observed among individuals reveal a higher social activity than previously described in Antillean manatees.


5.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
High prevalence but relatively low impact of two eucharitid parasitoids attacking the Neotropical ant Ectatomma tuberculatum (Olivier)
Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (coaut.) ; López Méndez, José Antonio (coaut.) ; Beugnon, Guy (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biological Control Vol. 52, no. 2 (February 2010) p. 131-139 ISSN: 1049-9644
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
44779-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Composition and dynamics of ant communities may be influenced by highly specialized, specific parasitoids such as eucharitids. Yet, little is known about their prevalence in ant societies. Through systematic monthly excavation of ant nests, we evaluated the impact on the Neotropical ant Ectatomma tuberculatum of two eucharitid parasitoid species, Dilocantha lachaudii and Isomerala coronata, which simultaneously attack the same host populations in southern Mexico. Nearly 90% of all the nests collected through the year were parasitized, with an average of 13% ant pupae and 6.7% ant larvae parasitized by eucharitids, and an annual loss of 17% of the ant brood. Eucharitid prevalence among host nests was, however, very variable, and only some E. tuberculatum nests were severely weakened (100% of ant brood parasitized). Parasitism was highest during the dry season (January–March), just when the production of ant pupae was minimum: up to 50.6% of the ant pupae were destroyed in March. However, production of E. tuberculatum males and females occurred later (June–July), and the reproductive potential of the host colonies did not ultimately seem to be heavily affected by eucharitid parasitism. Differences in the seasonal timing of eucharitid attack and ant reproduction thus have the potential to modulate the impact of eucharitids on ants. Our results are discussed in the context of the impact of eucharitids upon E. tuberculatum colonies and their possible effect on the community structure of this potential biocontrol agent ant.


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Insect attraction by webs of Nephila clavipes (Araneae: Nephilidae)
Hénaut, Yann ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Calmé, Sophie (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Arachnology Vol. 38, no. 1 (April 2010), p. 135-138 ISSN: 0161-8202
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Although well studied, the role of spider webs in attracting prey and the role of web ornaments remain open questions. We carried out a field study to determine whether webs of Nephila clavipes (Linnaeus 1767) attract insects. Nephila builds large orb-webs with debris-decoration that host kleptobiotic Argyrodes spiders. We studied the potential prey of Nephila with sticky traps placed in two similar linear plots. One plot contained 20 Nephila webs, and the other was cleared of Nephila webs. We measured the number and size of the insects caught in the traps. We compared the size of the trapped insects with prey caught by Nephila and gleaned by Argyrodes. In the plot with Nephila webs we collected 314 individuals versus 105 individuals in the plot without Nephila. Species of Diptera and Coleoptera were captured most frequently. Four saprophagous families, Phoridae and Sciaridae (both Diptera), Staphylinidae and Elateridae (both Coleoptera), were more abundant in the plot with Nephila webs. We show for the first time under natural conditions that prey attraction is most efficient for saprophagous insects, suggesting that the debris-decoration in Nephila webs attracts this guild. We also found that the size of some insects captured does not correspond to the range of prey consumed by Nephila, but to that of kleptobiotic Argyrodes spiders. We hypothesize that the debris-decoration may be used by Nephila as a strategy to limit food competition with Argyrodes.


7.
Artículo
Apparent influences of host-plant distribution on the structure and the genetic variability of local populations of the Purple Clay (Diarsia brunnea)
Luque, Carine ; Legal, Luc (coaut.) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Gers, Charles (coaut.) ; Wink, Michael (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biochemical Systematics and Ecology Vol. 37, no. 1 (February 2009), p. 6-15
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
38299-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Diarsia brunnea (Lepidoptera, Heterocera, Noctuidae, Denis and Schiffermuller, 1775) is an abundant oligophagous moth occurring in the French Pyrenees. No or little influence of the forest type was found on population densities. In order to study the genetic structure of two separate moth populations in a natural forest and in a plantation, genomic fingerprinting with ISSR markers (Inter Simple Sequence Repeats) was used. The goal was to search for potential spatial structuring which could be influenced by differences in forest type. No detectable genetic differences were observed between the populations of the two forest sites. But, although it was not possible to separate on the simple basis of the sampling site, a non-spatial structuring of three sub-populations became apparent. Three of the host plants known for this moth are present in the sampled locations. Three genetically distinct sub-populations were discovered which correlated with the abundance of the three host plants in the two forest plots.


8.
Artículo
Between introgression events and fragmentation, islands are the last refuge for the American crocodile in Caribbean Mexico
Machkour M'Rabet, Salima ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Charruau, Pierre Alexandre Rémy Robert (coaut.) ; Gevrey, Muriel (coaut.) ; Winterton, Peter (coaut.) ; Legal, Luc (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Marine Biology Vol. 156, no. 6 (May 2009), p. 1321-1333 ISBN:0025-3162
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
33638-40 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
33638-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
33638-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
33638-50 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Habitat loss and degradation in the Mexican Caribbean, caused by the development of tourism, have decreased the potential nesting area for the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) and have fragmented the populations of the Yucatan peninsula. Our study investigated Wve populations (three continental: North, South, Sian Ka’an, and two insular: Cozumel, Banco Chinchorro) of C. acutus in the Mexican Caribbean using seven diVerent inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers as tools for genetic variability and population diVerentiation. Three classiWcation methods were tested and compared: distance analysis, selforganizing map, and Bayesian methods, to evaluate the resolution of each method with ISSR markers. The 77 loci selected revealed a high variability between populations (polymorphism from 17% for Sian Ka’an to 75% for Banco Chinchorro) with a total polymorphism of 84% and a global coeYcient of gene diVerentiation (GST) of 0.296, but low values of Nei’s Gene diversity (from 0.065 for Sian Ka’an to 0.233 for Banco Chinchorro). Our results suggest elevated inbreeding in all local populations with higher indices for Banco Chinchorro and lower indices for Sian Ka’an. Three independent classiWcation methods gave similar results, and suggested that most continental individuals are admixtures, with diVerent levels of introgression, with the sympatric species Crocodylus moreletii. We propose that the islands/atolls remain the sole areas with genetically “pure” American crocodiles and we discuss these results for future conservation of this endangered crocodile species.