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7 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Yang, Xiaomei
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1.
- Tesis
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Índice

1. Introduction
2. Background information
2.1. Glyphosate
2.2. Problem description
3. Materials and methods
3.1. Study area
3.2. Sampling methods
3.3. Sample collection
3.4. Sample preparation
3.5. Glyphosate and AMPA determination
3.6. Statistical analysis
4. Results
4.1. Glyphosate in soil samples
4.2. AMPA in soil samples
5. Discussion
6. Conclusions
7. References
8. Annex
Annex 1. Description and coordinates of the monoliths
Annex 2. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrations (μg g-1) for soil and plant samples
Annex 3. Results of Shapiro-Wilk test for AMPA concertation in soil samples
Annex 4. Results of Mann-Whitney U test for AMPA concertation in soil samples


2.
Artículo
Effects of plastic mulch film residues on wheat rhizosphere and soil properties
Qi, Yueling (autora) ; Ossowicki, Adam (autor) ; Yang, Xiaomei (autora) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Dini Andreote, Francisco (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ; Garbeva, Paolina (autora) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Hazardous Materials Vol. 387, 121711 (2020), p. 1-7 ISSN: 0304-3894
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Resumen en inglés

Plastic residues could accumulate in soils as a consequence of using plastic mulching, which results in a serious environmental concern for agroecosystems. As an alternative, biodegradable plastic films stand as promising products to minimize plastic debris accumulation and reduce soil pollution. However, the effects of residues from traditional and biodegradable plastic films on the soil-plant system are not well studied. In this study, we used a controlled pot experiment to investigate the effects of macro- and micro- sized residues of low-density polyethylene and biodegradable plastic mulch films on the rhizosphere bacterial communities, rhizosphere volatile profiles and soil chemical properties. Interestingly, we identified significant effects of biodegradable plastic residues on the rhizosphere bacterial communities and on the blend of volatiles emitted in the rhizosphere. For example, in treatments with biodegradable plastics, bacteria genera like Bacillus and Variovorax were present in higher relative abundances and volatile compounds like dodecanal were exclusively produced in treatment with biodegradable microplastics. Furthermore, significant differences in soil pH, electrical conductivity and C:N ratio were observed across treatments. Our study provides evidence for both biotic and abiotic impacts of plastic residues on the soil-plant system, suggesting the urgent need for more research examining their environmental impacts on agroecosystems.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Biogenic transport of glyphosate in the presence of LDPE microplastics: a mesocosm experiment
Yang, Xiaomei ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Bemani, Akram (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Salánki, Tamás (coaut.) ; Guo, Xuetao (coaut.) ; Fu, Haimei (coaut.) ; Xue, Sha (coaut.) ; Ritsema, Coen (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 245 (February 2019), p. 829-835 ISSN: 1873-6424
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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The accumulation of plastic debris and herbicide residues has become a huge challenge and poses many potential risks to environmental health and soil quality. In the present study, we investigated the transport of glyphosate and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) via earthworms in the presence of different concentrations of light density polyethylene microplastics in the litter layer during a 14-day mesocosm experiment. The results showed earthworm gallery weight was negatively affected by the combination of glyphosate and microplastics. Glyphosate and AMPA concentrated in the first centimetre of the top soil layer and the downward transport of glyphosate and AMPA was only detected in the earthworm burrows, ranging from 0.04 to 4.25 μg g−¹ for glyphosate and from 0.01 (less than limit of detection) to 0.76 μg g−¹ for AMPA. The transport rate of glyphosate (including AMPA) from the litter layer into earthworm burrows ranged from 6.6 ± 4.6% to 18.3 ± 2.4%, depending on synergetic effects of microplastics and glyphosate application. The findings imply that earthworm activities strongly influence pollutant movement into the soil, which potentially affects soil ecosystems. Further studies focused on the fate of pollutants in the microenvironment of earthworm burrows are needed.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Leaching of microplastics by preferential flow in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) burrows
Yu, Miao (autor) ; van der Ploeg, Martine (autora) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Yang, Xiaomei (autora) ; Zhang, Shaoliang (autor) ; Ma, Xiaoyi (autora) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Environmental Chemistry Vol. 16, no. 1 (January 2019), p. 31-40 ISSN: 1448-2517
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In the current study, we examine how the activities of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) affect microplastic (MP) distribution and concentration in soil, with a focus on low density polyethylene (LDPE). We also want to determine if MPs can be flushed out with water. We used a laboratory sandy soil column (polyvinyl chloride tube) experimental set-up and tested five different treatments: (1) treatment with just soil (control) to check if the saturated conductivity (Ksat) could be impacted by MP, (2) treatment with MP, (3) treatment with MP and litter, (4) treatment with earthworms and litter as a second control for treatment 5 and (5) treatment with MPs, earthworms and litter. Each treatment consisted of eight replicates. For the treatments with MP, the concentration of MP added at the start of the experiment was 7 % by weight (3.97 g, polyethylene, 50 % 1 mm–250 µm, 30 % 250 µm–150 µm and 20 % <150 µm) based on 52.78 g of dry litter from Populus nigra. In the treatments using earthworms, two adult earthworms, with an initial average weight of (7.14 ± 0.26) g, were placed in each column. Results showed that LDPE particles could be introduced into the soil by the earthworms.

MP particles were detected in each soil sample and within different soil layers for the earthworm treatments. Earthworms showed a tendency to transport the smaller MP particles and that the amount of MPs in size class <250 μm increased in soil samples with increasing soil depth in comparison to the other size classes. After leaching, MPs were only detected in the leachate from the treatments with the earthworms, and the MP had similar size distributions as the soil samples in the 40–50 cm layer of the treatment with MP, earthworms and litter. The results of this study clearly show that biogenic activities can mobilise MP transport from the surface into the soil and even be leached into drainage. It is highly likely that biogenic activities constitute a potential pathway for MPs to be transported into soil and groundwater.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Decay of low-density polyethylene by bacteria extracted from earthworm's guts: a potential for soil restoration
Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autor) ; Thapa, Binita (coaut.) ; Yang, Xiaomei (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Salánki, Tamás (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ; Garbeva, Paolina (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 624 (May 2018), p. 753-757 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is the most abundant source of microplastic pollution worldwide. A recent study found that LDPE decay was increased and the size of the plastic was decreased after passing through the gut of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta). Here, we investigated the involvement of earthworm gut bacteria in the microplastic decay. The bacteria isolated from the earthworm's gut were Gram-positive, belonging to phylum Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. These bacteria were used in a short-term microcosm experiment performed with gamma-sterilized soil with or without LDPE microplastics (MP). We observed that the LDPE-MP particle size was significantly reduced in the presence of bacteria. In addition, the volatile profiles of the treatments were compared and clear differences were detected. Several volatile compounds such as octadecane, eicosane, docosane and tricosane were measured only in the treatments containing both bacteria and LDPE-MP, indicating that these long-chain alkanes are byproducts of bacterial LDPE-MP decay.


6.
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Influence of microplastic addition on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil
Yang, Xiaomei ; Bento, Célia P.M. (coaut.) ; Chen, Hao (coaut.) ; Zhang, Hongming (coaut.) ; Xue, Sha (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Zomer, Paul (coaut.) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 242, Part A (November 2018), p. 338-347 ISSN: 0269-7491
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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The intensive use of pesticide and plastic mulches has considerably enhanced crop growth and yield. Pesticide residues and plastic debris, however, have caused serious environmental problems. This study investigated the effects of the commonly used herbicide glyphosate and micrometre-sized plastic debris, referred as microplastics, on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil by a microcosm experiment over 30 days incubation. Results showed that glyphosate decay was gradual and followed a single first-order decay kinetics model. In different treatments (with/without microplastic addition), glyphosate showed similar half-lives (32.8 days). The soil content of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the main metabolite of glyphosate, steadily increased without reaching plateau and declining phases throughout the experiment. Soil microbial respiration significantly changed throughout the entirety of the experiment, particularly in the treatments with higher microplastic addition. The dynamics of soil β-glucosidase, urease and phosphatase varied, especially in the treatments with high microplastic addition. Particles that were considerably smaller than the initially added microplastic particles were observed after 30 days incubation. This result thus implied that microplastic would hardly affect glyphosate decay but smaller plastic particles accumulated in soils which potentially threaten soil quality would be further concerned especially in the regions with intensive plastic mulching application.


7.
Artículo
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Macro- and micro- plastics in soil-plant system: effects of plastic mulch film residues on wheat (Triticum aestivum) growth
Qi, Yueling ; Yang, Xiaomei (coaut.) ; Mejia Pelaez, Amalia (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Beriot, Nicolas (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Henny (coaut.) ; Garbeva, Paolina (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 645 (December 2018), p. 1048-1056 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Plastic residues have become a serious environmental problem in the regions with intensive use of plastic mulching. Even though plastic mulch is widely used, the effects of macro- and micro- plastic residues on the soil-plant system and the agroecosystem are largely unknown. In this study, low density polyethylene and one type of starch-based biodegradable plastic mulch film were selected and used as examples of macro- and micro- sized plastic residues. A pot experiment was performed in a climate chamber to determine what effect mixing 1% concentration of residues of these plastics with sandy soil would have on wheat growth in the presence and absence of earthworms. The results showed that macro- and micro- plastic residues affected both above-ground and below-ground parts of the wheat plant during both vegetative and reproductive growth. The type of plastic mulch films used had a strong effect on wheat growth with the biodegradable plastic mulch showing stronger negative effects as compared to polyethylene. The presence of earthworms had an overall positive effect on the wheat growth and chiefly alleviated the impairments made by plastic residues.