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54 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Bromelia
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1.
Artículo
Nest site selection during colony relocation in Yucatan Peninsula populations of the ponerine ants Neoponera villosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
Rocha, Franklin H. (autor) ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ; Pozo, Carmen (autora) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Insects Volumen 11, número 3, 200 (March 2020), páginas 1-15 ISSN: 2075-4450
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In the Yucatan Peninsula, the ponerine ant Neoponera villosa nests almost exclusively in tank bromeliads, Aechmea bracteata. In this study, we aimed to determine the factors influencing nest site selection during nest relocation which is regularly promoted by hurricanes in this area. Using ants with and without previous experience of Ae. bracteata, we tested their preference for refuges consisting of Ae. bracteata leaves over two other bromeliads, Ae. bromeliifolia and Ananas comosus. We further evaluated bromeliad-associated traits that could influence nest site selection (form and size). Workers with and without previous contact with Ae. bracteata significantly preferred this species over others, suggesting the existence of an innate attraction to this bromeliad. However, preference was not influenced by previous contact with Ae. bracteata. Workers easily discriminated between shelters of Ae. bracteata and A. comosus, but not those of the closely related Ae. bromeliifolia. In marked contrast, ants discriminated between similar sized Ae. bracteata and Ae. bromeliifolia plants, suggesting that chemical cues and plant structure play an important role. Size was also significant as they selected the largest plant when provided two dissimilar Ae. bracteata plants. Nest site selection by N. villosa workers seems to depend on innate preferences but familiarization with plant stimuli is not excluded.


2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Ant and spider species as surrogates for functional community composition of epiphyte-associated invertebrates in a tropical moist forest
Céréghino, Régis ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Hénaut, Yann (coaut.) ; Bonhomme, Camille (coaut.) ; Compin, Arthur (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecological Indicators Vol. 96, Part 1 (January 2019), p. 694-700 ISSN: 1470-160X
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Epiphytes represent up to 50% of all plant species in rainforests, where they host a substantial amount of invertebrate biomass. Efficient surrogates for epiphyte invertebrate communities could reduce the cost of biomonitoring surveys while preventing destructive sampling of the plants. Here, we focus on the invertebrate communities associated to tank bromeliads. We ask whether the presence of particular ant and/or spider taxa (easily surveyed taxa) that use these plants as nesting and/or foraging habitats predicts functional trait combinations of aquatic invertebrate communities hosted by the plants. Functional community composition of invertebrates was predicted both by bromeliad habitat features and the presence of certain ant and spider species. The ant Azteca serica preferred wider bromeliad rosettes that trap large amount of detritus, indicating interstitiallike food webs dominated by deposit feeders that burrow in fine particulate organic matter. Leucauge sp. spiders preferred narrower bromeliad rosettes bearing smaller detrital loads, thereby indicating a dominance of pelagic filter-feeding and predatory invertebrates in the water-filled leaf axils. Both Neoponera villosa ants and Eriophora sp. spiders preferred rosettes at intermediate size bearing moderate amounts of detritus, indicating a benthic food web dominated by leaf shredders and gathering collectors. Owing to the animal diversity and biomass supported by rainforest epiphytes, our approach would deserve to be further tested on a range of epiphytes involved in tight interactions with invertebrates. In this context, surrogate species could serve both as indicators of functional diversity, and as early-warning indicators of network disassembly.


3.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Impact of moss and epiphyte removal on coffee production and implications for epiphyte conservation in shade coffee plantations in southeast Mexico
Solís Montero, Lislie (autora) ; Quintana Palacios, Virgilio (autor) ; Damon, Anne Asbhy (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems Volumen 43, número 10 (2019), p. 1124–1144 ISSN: 2168-3573
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The“desmusgue” is a process wherein epiphytes are removed from coffee bushes to increase production but its benefits are largely anecdotal. The main aim of this study was to find out whether this practice effectively increases coffee production, its cost-benefit and its effect on epiphyte biodiversity. We found that coffee bushes of Coffea arabica and C. canephora that had epiphytes removed produced more fruits than those with epiphytes. However, the increase in production and in farmer's incomes were highly variable. This practice clearly endangers epiphyte biodiversity. In order to protect epiphytes and farmer income, farmers should be informed of the impact of “desmusgue” on epiphytes, and the consequences of biodiversity loss. In addition, coffee certification programs that subsidize epiphyte-friendly practices, and protected areas and community reserves that favor epiphytes should be established.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Resumen en: Inglés | Frances |
Resumen en inglés

In an inundated Mexican forest, 89 out of 92 myrmecophytic tank bromeliads (Aechmea bracteata) housed an associated ant colony: 13 sheltered Azteca serica, 43 Dolichoderus bispinosus, and 33 Neoponera villosa. Ant presence has a positive impact on the diversity of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities (n = 30 bromeliads studied). A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the presence and the species of ant are not correlated to bromeliad size, quantity of water, number of wells, filtered organic matter or incident radiation. The PCA and a generalized linear model showed that the presence of Azteca serica differed from the presence of the other two ant species or no ants in its effects on the aquatic invertebrate community (more predators). Therefore, both ant presence and species of ant affect the composition of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the tanks of A. bracteata, likely due to ant deposition of feces and other waste in these tanks.

Resumen en frances

Dans une forêt inondable du Mexique, sur 92 individus de la broméliacée myrmécophyte Aechmea bracteata, seuls trois étaient dépourvus d’une colonie de fourmis, 13 abritaient Azteca serica, 43 Dolichoderus bispinosus et 33 Neoponera villosa. La présence des fourmis favorise la diversité au sein des communautés aquatiques de macro-invertébrés (30 broméliacées étudiées, index de Shannon, profils de diversité). Une analyse en composantes principales (ACP) montre que la présence de fourmis n’est pas corrélée avec la taille de la plante, la quantité d’eau, le nombre de puits, la quantité de matière organique et la radiation incidente. L’ACP et un modèle mixte généralisé montrent un impact d’Azteca serica (comparé aux autres cas) attribuable à une plus grande quantité de prédateurs (effet top–down). La présence et l’identité des fourmis jouent un rôle sur la composition des communautés de macro-invertébrés aquatiques à travers des interactions directes, les ouvrières évacuant fèces et déchets dans les réservoirs.


5.
Artículo
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An arboreal spider protects its offspring by diving into the water of tank bromeliads
Hénaut, Yann ; Corbara, Bruno (coaut.) ; Azémar, Frédéric (coaut.) ; Céréghino, Régis (coaut.) ; Dézerald, Olivier (coaut.) ; Dejean, Alain (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Comptes Rendus Biologies Vol. 341, no. 3 (March 2018), p. 196-199 ISSN: 1631-0691
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Resumen en: Inglés | Frances |
Resumen en inglés

Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) individuals frequently live in association with tank bromeliads, including Aechmea bracteata, in Quintana Roo (Mexico). Whereas C. salei females without egg sacs hunt over their entire host plant, females carrying egg sacs settle above the A. bracteata reservoirs they have partially sealed with silk. There they avoid predators that use sight to detect their prey, as is known for many bird species. Furthermore, if a danger is more acute, these females dive with their egg sacs into the bromeliad reservoir. An experiment showed that this is not the case for males or females without egg sacs. In addition to the likely abundance of prey found therein, the potential of diving into the tank to protect offspring may explain the close association of this spider with bromeliads. These results show that, although arboreal, C. salei evolved a protective behavior using the water of tank bromeliads to protect offspring.

Resumen en frances

L’araignée Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) vit souvent en association avec la broméliacée à réservoir Aechmea bracteata. Dans le Quintana Roo (Mexique), les femelles qui transportent un cocon s’installent au-dessus d’un réservoir d’A. bracteata qu’elles obstruent partiellement de voiles de soie pour se camoufler des prédateurs. En présence de vibrations importantes et répétées, ces femelles plongent avec leur cocon dans l’eau du réservoir. Notre étude montre que les autres adultes (mâles et femelles sans cocon) n’utilisent pas les réservoirs d’eau. Ainsi, en plus de l’abondance de proies, la possibilité de pouvoir plonger pour protéger la descendance pourrait expliquer l’association entre cette espèce d’araignée et les broméliacées. Nos expériences montrent que les femelles porteuses d’un cocon manifestent une stratégie de protection vis-à-vis des cocons et d’elles-mêmes en s’immergeant durant 30, voire 90 minutes.


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Morphophysiological plasticity in epiphytic bromeliads across a precipitation gradient in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Cach Pérez, Manuel Jesús (autor) ; Andrade, José Luis (autor) ; Reyes García, Casandra (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Tropical Conservation Science Vol. 11 (2018), p. 1–10 ISSN: 1940-0829
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Plasticity may be a key factor to determine plant survival under a changing environment as a result of climate change or land use modification. Plasticity in physiological and morphological traits was evaluated in seven epiphytic Tillandsia species (Bromeliaceae) from six vegetation communities along a precipitation gradient in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Microenvironmental conditions (air temperature and humidity, light, and vapor pressure deficit), as well as Δ titratable acidity, osmotic potential, relative water content, and succulence were characterized during wet, early dry, and dry seasons. We calculated the relative distances plasticity index using physiological data from the wet and dry seasons; morphological plasticity was also calculated for foliar trichome and stomatal traits from previously published data. We found high variation in microenvironmental conditions between seasons, particularly for the tropical dry deciduous forest. The dry season had a negative effect in all physiological variables (decrease from 40% to 59% for Δ titratable acidity and 10% to 38% for relative water content). The highest plasticity was registered for T. balbisiana (physiological: 0.29, anatomical: 0.18) and the lowest for T. fasciculata and T. yucatana. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis separated individuals distributed in the wettest vegetation types from those distributed in the driest vegetation types, irrespective of the species, showing convergent physiological strategies to confront environmental variation. We found higher plasticity in water use traits in atmospheric species, compared to tanks and higher plasticity in general in species with wide distribution compared to those with small distribution ranges.


7.
- Artículo de divulgación
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Campeche, SIBE-Chetumal, SIBE-San Cristóbal, SIBE-Tapachula, SIBE-Villahermosa
Vida en las alturas: plantas indicadoras del cambio climático
Cach Pérez, Manuel Jesús ; Reyes García, Casandra (coaut.) ; Andrade Torres, José Luis (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: ECOfronteras Vol. 21, no. 59 (enero-abril 2017), p. 26-28 ISSN: 2007-4549
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
9746-70 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
9746-50 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
9746-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
9746-40 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
9746-60 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Campeche, SIBE-Chetumal, SIBE-San Cristóbal, SIBE-Tapachula, SIBE-Villahermosa
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Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

En la naturaleza existen plantas que pueden ser utilizadas como indicadoras de los potenciales efectos del cambio climático en una región particular. Las bromeliáceas epífitas poseen un tamaño pequeño, son de fácil manejo, toda el agua y nutrientes que necesitan son absorbidas a través de sus hojas y tienen un fuerte acoplamiento con la atmósfera a través del tipo de fotosíntesis que presentan. Además, estas plantas han demostrado una alta sensibilidad a la variación ambiental, por lo que se perfilan como una excelente herramienta para la modelación del cambio climático regional.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Environmental influence on the inter- and intraspecific variation in the density and morphology of stomata and trichomes of epiphytic bromeliads of the Yucatan Peninsula
Cach Pérez, Manuel Jesús ; Andrade, José L. (coaut.) ; Cetzal Ix, William Rolando (coaut.) ; Reyes García, Casandra (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society Vol. 181, no. 3 (July 2016), p. 441–458 ISSN: 1095-8339
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

We set out to test whether trichome and stomata variation in epiphytic bromeliads in the field would support the hypothesis that trichomes confer protection from excess light, increase water absorption and protect the stomata. We characterized the intra- and interspecific plasticity in the morphology and density of trichomes and stomata of 14 epiphytic bromeliad species found in six contrasting vegetation types (coastal sand dune scrub, scrub mangrove, pet en mangrove, and deciduous, semi-deciduous and semi-evergreen forest) on the Yucatan Peninsula along a precipitation gradient from 500 to 1500 mm (mean annual precipitation). We performed leaf impressions to determine trichome and stomatal density and to characterize morphology. Trichome morphology did not show variation between sites, but was distinctive for the species. Our data supported the existing hypothesis that trichome density and area were higher in the atmospheric species that inhabited the drier sites, compared with the wetter extreme, which may confer higher protection against photoinhibition and desiccation. Stomatal density increased with precipitation in tank species, and negatively correlated with vapour pressure deficit during the dry season. Fewer trichomes and greater numbers of stomata than expected by rainfall were found in mangroves that maintained low vapour pressure deficit during the dry season.


9.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Anfibios y reptiles asociados a tres especies de bromelias de tanque en el Parque Nacional Guanahacabibes, Cuba
García González, Alfredo ; García Padrón, Lázaro Yusnaviel (coaut.) ; Delgado Fernández, Freddy (coaut.) ; Riverón Giró, Frander Brian (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Cuadernos de Investigación UNED Vol. 6, no. 1 (junio 2014), p. 87-97 ISSN: 1659-4266
PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Se estudió la herpetofauna asociada a tres especies de bromelias de tanque en un bosque seco semideciduo sobre carso desnudo en el Parque Nacional Guanahacabibes, Cuba. Se seleccionaron 20 plantas adultas de cada una de las especies de bromelias (Tillandsia utriculata, T. fasciculata, Hohenbergia penduliflora). Determinamos las especies y altura de los árboles en los que las bromelias estaban creciendo. Removimos cada bromelia del árbol y se listaron las especies de anfibios y reptiles que se encontraron. Se calculó la abundancia relativa y el índice de dominancia de cada especie zoológica, y construimos un gráfico de diversidad. Había 34 anfibios y reptiles, de ocho especies (cinco familias). Cuatro especies son endémicas de Cuba (tres anfibios y un reptil). De las bromelias muestreadas 31,67% estaban ocupadas por herpetofauna, 67,65% de los animales se encontraron en T. utriculata. La herpetofauna tiende a preferir las bromelias a 2,31-3,20m de altura (categoría “Medio”). La especie más dominante fue Eleutherodactylus varians (abundancia relativa de 55,88%). Estas bromelias de tanque pueden considerarse como especies clave, su papel es primordial en estos bosques secos semideciduos (fundamentalmente T. utriculata) y los recursos que proporcionan son esenciales para la herpetofauna, particularmente para el anuro endémico E. varians.

Resumen en inglés

The herpetological fauna associated to three species of tank bromeliads was studied in a semideciduous dry forest on naked karst in the Guanahacabibes National Park, Cuba. We selected 20 adult plants of each one of the bromeliad species (Tillandsia utriculata, T. fasciculata, Hohenbergia penduliflora). We determined the tree species and height where bromeliads were growing on. Each bromeliad was removed from its tree and the species and number of each amphibian and reptile were listed. The relative abundance and dominance index of each zoological species were calculated and a dominance-diversity graphic was constructed. There were 34 amphibian and reptiles, belonging to eight species (five families). Four species were endemic to Cuba (three amphibians and one reptile). Of all bromeliads sampled 31,67% had herpetofauna, 67,65% of all animals were found in T. utriculata. The animals seem to prefer bromeliads 2,31-3,20m above ground (category “Medio”). The dominant species was Eleutherodactylus varians (relative abundance of 55,88%). These tank bromeliads can be considered key species, thus their role is paramount in these semideciduous dry forest (mainly T. utriculata) and the resources they provide are essential for the herpetofauna, particularly for the endemic anuran E. varians.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Impact of silvicultural methods on vascular epiphytes (ferns, bromeliads and orchids) in a temperate forest in Oaxaca, Mexico
Jiménez Bautista, Laura ; Damon, Anne Asbhy (coaut.) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (coaut.) ; Clark Tapia, Ricardo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Forest Ecology and Management Vol. 329 (October 2014), p. 10–20 ISSN: 0378-1127
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The impact of silvicultural management on the populations of epiphytes in pine-oak forest was evaluated in an area of Oaxaca State in Mexico, where the Method for Silvicultural Development (MSD) is practiced. Sampling was carried out in 5 management categories and their border areas (−B): Reforestation with Pine only (RP, RP-B), Reforestation with Pine with Nurse Trees (RPNTr, RPNTr-B), Harvest and Regeneration in Stands (HRSt, HRSt-B), areas where a First Thinning has been carried out (1stThin, 1stThin-B) and Conservation areas (CONSV, with no border area). Four transects measuring 50 × 4 m were set up in each management category of which 2 were in the managed area and 2 in the border area. A total of 32 tree species acting as phorophytes hosting epiphytes, and 31species of epiphytes were recorded (15 orchids, 5 bromeliads and 11 ferns). There was significantly greater abundance of epiphytes in the categories 1stThin-B (2353 ind.) and CONSV (2195 ind.) compared to RPNTr (67 ind.) and RP with only 18 individuals. There was a significant difference between management categories for the abundance of orchids and ferns but not for bromeliads. Rhynchostele aptera (Orchidaceae), Tillandsia violacea (Bromeliaceae) and Polypodium sp. (Polypodiaceae) were common throughout the study area, whereas Alamania punicea, Lepanthes schiedei, Rhynchostele cordata (Orchidaceae), Asplenium cuspidatum (Aspleniaceae), Elaphoglossum peltatum (Dryopteridaceae) and Ceradenia oidiophora (Polypodiaceae) were only found in a single category of silvicultural management or conservation area.

The biodiversity indices used (Shannon–Weiner, Simpson and True Diversity), indicated that HRSt and CONSV were the most diverse, and RP and RPNTr the least diverse categories. The phorophytes with the greatest abundance of epiphytes were Quercus crassifolia, Ternstroemia lineata and Rapanea juergensenii. We conclude that the silvicultural management category Harvest and Regeneration in Stands (HRSt) favors the conservation of epiphytes, that trees of the genus Quercus are the best phorophytes, that Pinus ayacahuite is a phorophyte for a variety of species especially orchids whereas Pinus patula is a relatively poor phorophyte, and suggest that the borders of managed areas, and reforestation with a diversity of tree species make an important contribution to epiphyte conservation.