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95 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Contaminación de suelos
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1.
Libro
Investigación para el desarrollo regional sur: Chiapas, Guerrero y Oaxaca
Toledo Flores, Javier (editor) ;
Distrito Federal, México : Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología :: Sistema de Investigación Benito Juárez , s.f.
Clasificación: CH/307.12097275 / I5
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010012034 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020012039 (Disponible) , ECO020012038 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2

2.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Phytoremediation of soils contaminated by hydrocarbon
Chan Quijano, José Guadalupe (autor) ; Cach Pérez, Manuel Jesús (autor) ; Rodríguez Robles, Ulises (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Phytoremediation: in-situ applications / editor: Brian R. Shmaefsky Geneva, Switzerland : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019, 2020 páginas 83-101 ISBN:978-3-030-00098-1
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

It is estimated that more than one-third of the world soils are seriously contaminated due to anthropological activities. Much of this contamination is due to oil industry activities which cause significant changes in the ecosystems due to the processes of exploration, refining, transportation and commercialization of products derived from oil. Plants have become biotechnologies for the recovery of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils given that they can absorb and degrade significant amounts of the pollutants. Most plants live in symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal fungi and/or arbuscular mycorrhizas that can facilitate the remediation of contaminated soils. In addition, rhizosphere microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and nematodes have the ability to consume hydrocarbons as sources of energy and carbon, thereby playing a very important role in the remediation of contaminated soils. The remediation of areas contaminated with oil hydrocarbons is making it necessary to conduct studies on each contaminant regarding the damages and/or benefits theymay be causing in the rhizosphere and in plant physiology.


3.
Artículo
Sewage sludge application as a vehicle for microplastics in eastern Spanish agricultural soils
van den Berg, Pim (autor) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Corradini, Fabio (autor) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 261, article number 114198 (June 2020), p. 1-7 ISSN: 1873-6424
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Microplastic pollution is becoming a major challenge with the growing use of plastic. In recent years, research about microplastic pollution in the environment has become a field of study with increased interest, with ever expanding findings on sources, sinks and pathways of microplastics. Wastewater treatment plants effectively remove microplastics from wastewater and concentrate them in sewage sludge which is often used to fertilise agricultural fields. Despite this, quantification of microplastic pollution in agricultural fields through the application of sewage sludge is largely unknown. In light of this issue, four wastewater treatment plants and 16 agricultural fields (0–8 sewage sludge applications of 20 e 22 tons ha-¹ per application), located in the east of Spain, were sampled. Microplastics were extracted using a floatation and filtration method, making a distinction between light density microplastics (ρ < 1 g cm−³) and heavy density microplastics (ρ > 1 g cm−³). Sewage sludge, on average, had alight density plastic load of 18,000 ± 15,940 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 32,070 ± 19,080 microplastics kg-¹. Soils without addition of sewage sludge had an average light density plastic load of 930 ± 740 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 1100 ± 570 microplastics kg-¹. Soils with addition of sewage sludge had an average light density plastic load of 2130 ± 950 microplastics kg-¹ and a heavy density plastic load of 3060 ± 1680 microplastics kg-¹. On average, soils’plastic loads increased by 280 light density microplastics kg-¹ and 430 heavy density microplastics kg-¹ with each successive application of sewage sludge, indicating that sewage sludge application results in accumulation of microplastics in agricultural soils.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Evidence of microplastic accumulation in agricultural soils from sewage sludge disposal
Corradini, Fabio (autor) ; Meza, Pablo (autor) ; Eguiluz, Raúl (autor) ; Casado, Francisco (autor) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autora) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Science of The Total Environment Vol. 671 (June 2019), p. 411-420 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Microplastics are emerging as a steadily increasing environmental threat. Wastewater treatment plants efficiently remove microplastics from sewage, trapping the particles in the sludge and preventing their entrance into aquatic environments. Treatment plants are essentially taking the microplastics out of the waste water and concentrating themin the sludge, however. It has become common practice to use this sludge on agricultural soils as a fertilizer. The aimof the current researchwas to evaluate the microplastic contamination of soils by this practice, assessing the implications of successive sludge applications by looking at the total count of microplastic particles in soil samples. Thirty-one agricultural fields with different sludge application records and similar edaphoclimatic conditions were evaluated. Field records of sludge application covered a ten year period. For all fields, historical disposal events used the same amount of sludge (40 ton ha−¹ dry weight). Extraction of microplasticswas done by flotation and particles were then counted and classifiedwith the help of a microscope. Seven sludge samples were collected in the fields that underwent sludge applications during the study period. Soils where 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 applications of sludge had been performed had a median of 1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 2.3, and 3.5 particles g−¹ dry soil, respectively. There were statistical differences in the microplastic contents related to the number of applications that a field had undergone (1, 2, 3 b 4, 5). Microplastic content in sludge ranged from 18 to 41 particles g−¹, with a median of 34 particles g−¹.

The majority of the observed microplastics were fibers (90% in sludge, and 97% in soil). Our results indicate that microplastic counts increase over time where successive sludge applications are performed. Microplastics observed in soil samples stress the relevance of sludge as a driver of soil microplastic contamination.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Predicting soil microplastic concentration using vis-NIR spectroscopy
Corradini, Fabio ; Bartholomeus, Harm (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 650, part 1, (February 2019), p. 922-932 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Microplastic accumulation in soil may have a detrimental impact on soil biota. The lack of standardized methods to identify and quantify microplastics in soils is an obstacle to research. Existing techniques are time-consuming and field data are seldom collected. To tackle the problem, we explored the possibilities of using a portable spectroradiometer working in the near infrared range (350–2500 nm) to rapidly assess microplastic concentrations in soils without extraction. Four sets of artificially polluted soil samples were prepared. Three sets had only one polymer polluting the soil (low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), or polyvinyl chloride (PVC)). The fourth set contained random amounts of the three polymers (Mix). The concentrations of microplastics were regressed on the reflectance observed for each of the 2150 wavelengths registered by the instrument, using a Bayesian approach. For a measurement range between 1 and 100 g kg−¹, results showed a root-mean-squared-deviation (RMSD) of 8, 18, and 10 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC. The Mix treatment presented an RMSD of 8, 10, and 5 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC. The repeatability of the proposed method was 0.2–8.4, 0.1–5.1, and 0.1–9.0 g kg−¹ for LDPE, PET, and PVC, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that vis-NIR techniques are suitable to identify and quantify LDPE, PET, and PVC microplastics in soil samples, with a 10 g kg−¹ accuracy and a detection limit ≈ 15 g kg−¹. The method proposed is different than other approaches since it is faster because it avoids extraction steps and can directly quantify the amount of plastic in a sample. Nevertheless, it seems to be useful only for pollution hotspots.


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Presence of pesticides and toxicity assessment of agricultural soils in the Quintana Roo mayan zone, Mexico using biomarkers in earthworms (Eisenia fetida)
Andrade Herrera, Moisés (autor) ; Escalona Segura, Griselda (autora) ; González Jáuregui, Mauricio (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Vargas Contreras, Jorge Albino (autor) ; Rendón von Osten, Jaime (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Water, Air, & Soil Pollution Vol. 230, no. 59 (March 2019), p. 1-13 ISSN: 0049-6979
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Agriculture intensification and the use of pesticides have led to biodiversity loss due to soil toxic compounds. Thus, soil contamination studies are important to understand the negative effects in the physicochemical interactions. The use of biomarkers through bioindicators is a useful tool for assessing toxicity in agricultural environments complemented with the determination of pesticides. The objectives of this study were to determine the presence of organochlorine (OCPs) and organophosphate (OPPs) pesticides and the soil’s potential toxicity in agricultural fields with different crops from the center of Quintana Roo State, using a set of enzymatic biomarkers (BMs), such as acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-Transferase (GST), and catalase (CAT) on earthworms (Eisenia fetida). Earthworms were exposed for 96 h on nine different agricultural soils as well as on a reference soil from a conservation area. Within all samples of soils, only OCPs were detected in low concentrations (ranged from non-detected to 1.40 ppm). However, no correlation was observed between these pesticides and the BMs activity. AChE and CAT activity was significantly inhibited in at least one agricultural soil if compared to the conservation area, while no significant differences of GST were observed. The AChE activity observed suggests the presence of anticholinergic substances (that were neither detected nor determined analytically) in the sampled soils. The characterization of oxidative stress BMs was not correlated with the OCPs analyzed. Our results demonstrate that further studies of toxicity under field conditions are required, given the complexity of environmental conditions outside the laboratory.


7.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
¿Tinto, cedro y macuilís al rescate de suelos contaminados por petróleo?
Chan Quijano, José Guadalupe ; Cach Pérez, Manuel Jesús (coaut.) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Diálogos No. 56 (abril 2019), p. 6-11 ISSN: 16653505
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
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8.
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Decay of low-density polyethylene by bacteria extracted from earthworm's guts: a potential for soil restoration
Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (autor) ; Thapa, Binita (coaut.) ; Yang, Xiaomei (coaut.) ; Gertsen, Hennie (coaut.) ; Salánki, Tamás (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ; Garbeva, Paolina (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Science of the Total Environment Vol. 624 (May 2018), p. 753-757 ISSN: 0048-9697
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is the most abundant source of microplastic pollution worldwide. A recent study found that LDPE decay was increased and the size of the plastic was decreased after passing through the gut of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta). Here, we investigated the involvement of earthworm gut bacteria in the microplastic decay. The bacteria isolated from the earthworm's gut were Gram-positive, belonging to phylum Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. These bacteria were used in a short-term microcosm experiment performed with gamma-sterilized soil with or without LDPE microplastics (MP). We observed that the LDPE-MP particle size was significantly reduced in the presence of bacteria. In addition, the volatile profiles of the treatments were compared and clear differences were detected. Several volatile compounds such as octadecane, eicosane, docosane and tricosane were measured only in the treatments containing both bacteria and LDPE-MP, indicating that these long-chain alkanes are byproducts of bacterial LDPE-MP decay.


9.
Tesis - Doctorado
PDF
Índice | Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

La utilización de plaguicidas sintéticos para combatir las plagas influyen en la salud de diversos organismos incluyendo al hombre. Para conocer su impacto se utilizan herramientas de evaluación como especies bioindicadoras, y biomarcadores (BM) para evaluar el daño derivado de la exposición. En este sentido, diversos invertebrados del suelo (lombrices de tierra) y pequeños mamíferos silvestres pueden ser bioindicadores adecuados para este propósito debido a sus propiedades ecológicas. En la zona maya de Quintana Roo, los campos agrícolas están aledaños a zonas forestales y se utilizan paquetes tecnológicos basados en el uso de plaguicidas y fertilizantes sintéticos para el cultivo de sandía y papaya principalmente, los cuales son aplicados sin las medidas de seguridad necesarias por lo que el contacto con las especies silvestres es casi inevitable. Por lo tanto, los objetivos del presente trabajo fueron documentar la toxicidad de diferentes suelos agrícolas y su influencia en la fauna silvestre expuesta accidentalmente, tanto a escala espacial (zona de aplicación y zona conservada) y a escala temporal (lluvias-secas). Se obtuvieron muestras de suelo (análisis de presencia de plaguicidas) y se usaron lombrices de tierra, ratones y murciélagos, como bioindicadores, en los que se evaluó la toxicidad a través de biomarcadores (BM) enzimáticos como la acetilcolinesterasa (AChE), glutatión-S-Transferasa (GST) y catalasa (CAT). Se detectaron bajas concentraciones de algunos plaguicidas organoclorados tanto en el suelo como en el tejido hepático (ratones), lo que no representa un riesgo a corto plazo debido a esta condición. Asimismo, el análisis de BM mostró que la toxicidad por la exposición es moderada. También se registró una disminución en la actividad de la AChE (tanto en ratones como en murciélagos) para la temporada lluviosa, lo que sugiere una influencia de compuestos anticolinérgicos para esta temporada.

Sin embargo, a escala espacial, no se encontraron diferencias significativas en la actividad de los BM (en murciélagos), lo que sugiere que la toxicidad en este estudio se encuentra modulada por la temporalidad, más que por la distancia a la zona de aplicación de plaguicidas. Finalmente, este es el primer trabajo que documenta los efectos subletales en fauna silvestre derivados de la exposición accidental a plaguicidas en la región. Asimismo, se recomienda realizar más estudios complementando baterías de BM y comparando con sitios más alejados para tener un escenario más completo.

Índice

Resumen
Capítulo 1. Introducción General
Introducción
Justificación
Hipótesis
Objetivo General
Objetivos particulares
Metodos Generales
Literatura Citada
Capítulo 2
Abstract
Introduction
Materials and Methods
2.1 Soil samples
2.2 Texture, pH. and Organic matter soil determination
2.3 Pesticide determination
2.4 Soil preparation for exposure
2.5 Bioassay
2.6 Statistical Analysis
Results and Discussion
Conclusions
References
Capítulo 3
Literatura Citada
Peso Húmedo
Peso Seco
Capítulo 4
Introducción
Materiales y Métodos
Área de estudio
Capturas
Análisis de los Biomarcadores
Análisis estadísticos
Resultados y Discusión
Conclusiones
Literatura Citada
Capítulo 5
Conclusiones


10.
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Influence of microplastic addition on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil
Yang, Xiaomei ; Bento, Célia P.M. (coaut.) ; Chen, Hao (coaut.) ; Zhang, Hongming (coaut.) ; Xue, Sha (coaut.) ; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza (coaut.) ; Zomer, Paul (coaut.) ; Ritsema, Coen J. (coaut.) ; Geissen Geissen, Violette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Pollution Vol. 242, Part A (November 2018), p. 338-347 ISSN: 0269-7491
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The intensive use of pesticide and plastic mulches has considerably enhanced crop growth and yield. Pesticide residues and plastic debris, however, have caused serious environmental problems. This study investigated the effects of the commonly used herbicide glyphosate and micrometre-sized plastic debris, referred as microplastics, on glyphosate decay and soil microbial activities in Chinese loess soil by a microcosm experiment over 30 days incubation. Results showed that glyphosate decay was gradual and followed a single first-order decay kinetics model. In different treatments (with/without microplastic addition), glyphosate showed similar half-lives (32.8 days). The soil content of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the main metabolite of glyphosate, steadily increased without reaching plateau and declining phases throughout the experiment. Soil microbial respiration significantly changed throughout the entirety of the experiment, particularly in the treatments with higher microplastic addition. The dynamics of soil β-glucosidase, urease and phosphatase varied, especially in the treatments with high microplastic addition. Particles that were considerably smaller than the initially added microplastic particles were observed after 30 days incubation. This result thus implied that microplastic would hardly affect glyphosate decay but smaller plastic particles accumulated in soils which potentially threaten soil quality would be further concerned especially in the regions with intensive plastic mulching application.