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4 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Burslem, David F. R. P
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1.
Libro
Biotic interactions in the tropics: their role in the maintenance of species diversity / edited by David F. R. P. Burslem, Michelle A. Pinard, Sue E. Hartley
Burslem, David F. R. P. (ed.) ; Pinard, Michelle A. (coed.) ; Hartley, Sue E. (coed.) ;
Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press , 2005
Clasificación: 333.95 / B55
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020012270 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Conservation assessment of Guaiacum sanctum and Guaiacum coulteri: historic distribution and future trends in Mexico
López Toledo, Leonel ; González Salazar, Constantino (coaut.) ; Burslem, David F. R. P (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 43, no. 2 (March 2011), p. 246-255 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
50517-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Guaiacum sanctum and Guaiacum coulteri are long-lived Mesoamerican timber tree species heavily exploited throughout their range and considered to be at risk of extinction. Both species are included on the IUCN Red List and on CITES Appendix II, but there has been no formal assessment of the conservation status of either species. We used ecological niche modeling and rapid assessments of local density and population size structure to provide such evaluations. For the year 2000, we estimated geographic range sizes for G. sanctum and G. coulteri of 95,422 and 130,973 km2, respectively. The main core remaining habitat for G. sanctum occurs in Campeche State (Yucatan Peninsula), where populations exhibit high adult abundance and profuse regeneration. Several areas along the Mexican Pacific coast remain with suitable habitat for G. coulteri. Guaiacum coulteri is at greater risk as only 1.3 percent of its current habitat is protected, which contrasts with the 13.2 percent of current habitat protected for G. sanctum. We projected that available habitat for G. sanctum and G. coulteri will decline by a further 30–50 percent by 2020 if estimated habitat loss rates continue. We suggest that under the IUCN criteria, the conservation status of G. sanctum and G. coulteri should be updated to near threatened and vulnerable, respectively. Additionally, we conclude that the amount of protected habitat needs to be increased to safeguard both species. Our study provides a quantitative basis for updating the conservation status of both species and illustrates an assessment framework that could be applied to other threatened tree species.


3.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Protecting a single endagered species and meeting multiple conservation goals: an approach with Guaiacum sanctum in Yucatan Peninsula, México
López Toledo, Leonel ; Ibarra Manríquez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Burslem, David F. R. P (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Diversity and Distributions Vol. 18, no. 5-6 (May-June 2012), p. 575-587 ISSN: 1366-9516
Bibliotecas: Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
52275-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Aim  New protected areas should consider safeguarding high conservation value sites based on multiple criteria and not just the presence of a single endangered or charismatic species. However, the extent to which complementary criteria coincide is usually unknown. We use the case of Guaiacum sanctum (Zygopyllaceae), an endangered timber tree species, to explore whether the protection of forests where this species is most abundant would meet other complementary conservation goals, such as capturing regional plant biodiversity, protecting other threatened/endemic species or safeguarding ecosystem services. Location  Yucatan Peninsula, southern Mexico. Methods  We conducted an analysis of the structure, composition and diversity of tree communities (including stems ≥5 cm dbh) at eight G. sanctum forest sites. We identified endemic and threatened tree species and quantified above-ground tree biomass and carbon storage in these G. sanctum forests. Results Guaiacum sanctum forests contain 35–59 tree species on plots as small as 1000 m2. The species composition of tree communities changed rapidly (high β-diversity) across soil boundaries and rainfall regimes. Twenty-one endemic and eight threatened tree species were recorded in our inventories. Individuals of G. sanctum represented up to 55% of the above-ground carbon for trees ≥5 cm dbh. The high basal area of G. sanctum forests plus the high wood density, abundance, large size and longevity (more than 500 years) of G. sanctum and other tree species enhance the potential importance of these forests for carbon storage.  

Main conclusions  A conservation strategy focused on protecting important populations of G. sanctum in the Yucatan Peninsula would have significant co-benefits for conservation of regional tree species biodiversity and provision of critical ecosystem services. Our study illustrates a multiple criteria approach useful for the selection of areas with high conservation value on the basis of endemic, threatened species, species richness and ecosystem services.


4.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Protecting a single endangered species and meeting multiple conservation goals: an approach with Guaiacum sanctum in Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
López Toledo, Leonel ; Ibarra Manríquez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Burslem, David F. R. P. (coaut.) ; Martínez Salas, Esteban (coaut.) ; Pineda García, Fernando (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Diversity and Distributions Vol. 18, no. 5-6 (May-June 2012), p. 575-587 ISSN: 1366-9516
Bibliotecas: Chetumal
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
51645-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Chetumal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Aim new protected areas should consider safeguarding high conservation value sites based on multiple criteria and not just the presence of a single endangered or charismatic species. However, the extent to which complementary criteria coincide is usually unknown. We use the case of Guaiacum sanctum (Zygopyllaceae), an endangered timber tree species, to explore whether the protection of forests where this species is most abundant would meet other complementary conservation goals, such as capturing regional plant biodiversity, protecting other threatened endemic species or safeguarding ecosystem services.