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4 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Pérez Salicrup, Diego Rafael
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Mexico harbors more than 10% of the planet’s endemic species. However, the integrity and biodiversity of many ecosystems is experiencing rapid transformation under the influence of a wide array of human and natural disturbances. In order to disentangle the effects of human and natural disturbance regimes at different spatial and temporal scales, we selected six terrestrial (temperate montane forests, montane cloud forests, tropical rain forests, tropical semi-deciduous forests, tropical dry forests, and deserts) and four aquatic (coral reefs, mangrove forests, kelp forests and saline lakes) ecosystems. We used semi-quantitative statistical methods to assess (1) the most important agents of disturbance affecting the ecosystems, (2) the vulnerability of each ecosystem to anthropogenic and natural disturbance, and (3) the differences in ecosystem disturbance regimes and their resilience. Our analysis indicates a significant variation in ecological responses, recovery capacity, and resilience among ecosystems. The constant and widespread presence of human impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is reflected either in reduced area coverage for most systems, or reduced productivity and biodiversity, particularly in the case of fragile ecosystems (e.g., rain forests, coral reefs). In all cases, the interaction between historical human impacts and episodic high intensity natural disturbance (e.g., hurricanes, fires) has triggered a reduction in species diversity and induced significant changes in habitat distribution or species dominance. The lack of monitoring programs assessing before/after effects of major disturbances in Mexico is one of the major limitations to quantifying the commonalities and differences of disturbance effects on ecosystem properties.


2.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Demographic effects of legal timber harvesting on Guaiacum sanctum L., an endangered neotropical tree: implications for conservation
López Toledo, Leonel ; Murillo García, Angélica (coaut.) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (coaut.) ; Pérez Salicrup, Diego Rafael (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Interciencia Vol. 36, no. 9 (September 2011), p. 650-656 ISSN: 0378-1844
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
51181-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Guaiacum sanctum is a timber tree species from the Americas, considered threatened in eleven different countries, including Mexico, and listed in CITES Appendix II. This species is currently harvested legally in the southern Mexican state of Campeche. Despite its protected status, the current condition of its populations and the effects of harvesting upon them have not been assessed. The conservation status of four unlogged populations were evaluated across Central Campeche by documenting their densities and demographic structures, and then compared the size class demographic structures of one unlogged and three logged populations at different times after harvest (3, 8 and 20 years) to evaluate the effects of timber harvesting upon population structure. Additionally, a regeneration index (proportion of seedlings within the population) was estimated for each of the seven populations. Densities of G. sanctum varied from 278 to 1732 stems/ha with ≥1cm at 1.3m·height in Campeche. Differences were found in the population structures of unlogged populations, although the density of seedlings and trees was high in all of the sites. Contrary to expectations, higher densities were found in all size classes in logged populations. Results suggest that current logging practices do not have a drastic negative effect on the density of remaining individuals. Although the results indicate that G. sanctum in Campeche is not locally endangered, it is recommend that it be maintained in CITES Appendix II.


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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

En México y en el mundo, la incorporación de la comunidad científica (entre ellos los ecólogos) a la generación de conocimientos que coadyuven a solucionar los graves problemas ambientales, y avanzar hacia la sustentabilidad, requiere de una visión diferente en la investigación. Más aún, se requiere de herramientas novedosas para acoplar el trabajo de la comunidad científica con el resto de la sociedad. Los ecólogos tienen el reto devolverse innovadores y creadores de nuevos modelos, procesos de colaboración, métodos y herramientas de investigación, básica y aplicada, entemas como la agricultura, la forestería, la ganadería y el uso de los recursos naturales. Para enfrentar este reto, los ecólogos en México necesitan amalgamar su quehacer con el de otros actores académicos y no académicos para impulsar en conjunto procesos de mejoramiento ambiental con beneficios sociales. En esta contribución se revisan retos y perspectivas que se tienen en México en el campo de innovación ecotecnológica. Se propone fomentar el trabajo de investigación en laboratorios sin muros, en los cuales grupos flexibles de actores diseñen, prueben y evalúen innovaciones tecnológicas que respondan a problemáticas ambientales y socioecológicas locales y regionales específicas.

Resumen en inglés

In Mexico and in the world, the incorporation of the scientific community (among them ecologists) to the generation of knowledge that contributes to solving the serious environmental problems, and advancing towards the sustainability, requires a different research vision. Moreover, innovative tools are needed to couple the work of the scientific community with the rest of the society. Ecologists are challenged to become innovators and creators of new models, collaborative processes, methods and research tools, basic and applied, in topics such as agriculture, forestry, livestock andthe use of natural resources. To meet this challenge, ecologists in Mexico need to amalgamate their work with other academic and non-academic actors to jointly promote environmental improvement processes with social benefits. This contribution examines challenges and perspectives of ecotechnological innovation in Mexico. We suggest to foster the research work in this field in laboratories without walls, in which flexible groups of actors design, test, and evaluate ecotechnological innovations that respond to specific local and regional socio-ecological and environmental problems.


4.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Effect of fire on the germination of spores of Pteridium caudatum, an invasive fern
Ramírez Trejo, María del Rosario ; Pérez García, Blanca (coaut.) ; Pérez Salicrup, Diego Rafael (coaut.) ; Orozco Segovia, Alma (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Journal Tropical Ecology No. 26 (July 2010), p. 457-465 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
49411-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Pteridium caudatum is a fern that frequently invades burnt areas in the Yucatán Peninsula and other neotropical sites. While post-fire regeneration of this fern apparently occurs mainly by vegetative means, little is known about the role of its spores in post-fire regeneration and in colonization of newly invaded fields. Central to these questions is whether bracken fern spores maintain their viability after fires. Here we experimentally evaluate the effect of fire-induced temperatures on Pteridium caudatum spore germination. We used 1200-cm3 blocks containing a constant fuel load of 47.4 g of litter, in which we placed spores at three different depths. The blocks were then ignited, and temperatures at each depth were monitored at 1-min intervals for 2 h. One day after the experimental fires, spores were dug out and cultured at 25 °C and 12-h light/dark cycles. Soil temperatures decreased significantly in relation to depth during fires. Spores on the surface were severely affected by fire, while those buried at 1 and 3 cm showed 77% germination. Germination in unburned controls was 86%. Our results suggest that during fires, Pteridium caudatum spores buried a few centimetres below the surface have a high percentage of viability, which could explain the rapid establishment of this species in burnt fields.