Términos relacionados

37 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Perfecto, Ivette
  • «
  • 1 de 4
  • »
1.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Reducción en la diversidad y complejiad del ensamble de hormigas de la hojarasca en plantaciones de café colombianas = Reduced diversity and complexity in the leaf-litter ant assemblage of colombian coffee plantations
Armbrecht, Inge ; Rivera, Leonardo (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 19, no. 3 (june 2005), p. 897-907 ISSN: 1987-2001
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B5486 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal

2.
Libro
Actas del simposio café y biodiversidad / editores: Alex Monro y María Carmen Peña Chocarro
Congreso de la Sociedad Mesoamericana para la Biología y la Conservación (5 : 2001 : San Salvador) ; Monro, Alex (ed.) ; Peña Chocarro, María Carmen (coed.) ;
San Salvador, El Salvador : The Natural History Museum :: Universidad de El Salvador , 2002
Clasificación: F/633.730972 / C6
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020007883 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1


PDF
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

En junio de 2008 convocamos un foro-taller en Chiapas, México para potencializar alianzas entre organizaciones campesinas, conservacionistas y académicos. Los ponentes trazaron la evolución de las relaciones entre sistemas productivos, bosques y biodiversidad desde la época prehispánica hasta la actual crisis de la economía neoliberal y la agricultura industrial. También delinearon un nuevo paradigma para la conservación en donde los campesinos son protagonistas. En grupos de trabajo, elaboramos propuestas para cimentar una agenda común entre los distintos sectores representados. Las redes de cooperación emergieron como estructuras para coordinar acción y facilitar el intercambio de información y apoyo a distintas escalas geográficas. Los mercados solidarios son la confluencia de diversos intereses en dónde se pueden constituir dichas redes. También identificamos algunos temas específicos de trabajo, entre ellos: los agrocombustibles y la soberanía energética, los servicios ambientales y la educación para el campo. La biodiversidad y la soberanía alimentaria y territorial son los ejes de esta agenda de cooperación, que forma parte de una lucha internacional para reconstruir nuestros sistemas alimenticios.

Resumen en inglés

In June, 2008, we convoked a forum and workshop in Chiapas, Mexico to strengthen alliances among farmers’ organizations, conservationists and academics. Speakers outlined the evolution of the relations among production systems, forests and biodiversity from the prehispanic era through the current crisis in the neoliberal economic model and industrial agriculture. They also framed a new conservation paradigm that prioritizes the role of farmers. We formed working groups that elaborated proposals for collaboration among the participating sectors. Cooperative networks emerged as appropriate structures for coordinating action and facilitating the exchange of information and support at various geographic scales. Solidarity-based markets are a venue where diverse interests converge, favoring the formation of such networks. We also identified some specific issues for collaboration, including: agrofuels and energy sovereignty, environmental services and rural education. Biodiversity and food sovereignty are the two axes of this agenda for cooperation that forms part of an international struggle to reconstruct our food systems.


5.
- Artículo con arbitraje
The Azteca chess experience: learning how to share concepts of ecological complexity with small coffee farmers
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Cruz Morales, Juana (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology and Society Vol. 22, no. 2, Art. 37 (Jun 2017), p. 1-20 ISSN: 1708-3087
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Small-scale coffee farmers understand certain complex ecological processes, and successfully navigate some of the challenges emerging from the ecological complexity on their farms. It is generally thought that scientific knowledge is able to complement farmers’ knowledge. However, for this collaboration to be fruitful, the gap between the knowledge frameworks of both farmers and scientists will need to be closed. We report on the learning results of 14 workshops held in Chiapas, Mexico during 2015 in which 117 small-scale coffee farmers of all genders (30% women) and ages who had little schooling were exposed by researchers to a natural history narrative, a multispecies network representation, a board game, and a series of graphical quizzes, all related to a nine-species complex ecological network with potential for autonomous control of the ongoing and devastating coffee rust epidemic that was affecting them. Farmers’ retention and understanding of direct and indirect bilateral interactions among organisms was assessed with different methods to elucidate the effect of adding Azteca Chess gaming sessions to a detailed and very graphical lecture. Evaluation methods that were better adapted to farmers’ conditions improved learning scores and showed statistically significant age effect (players older than 40 had lower retention scores) and gaming effect (lower retention of interactions included in the lecture but not in the game). The combination of lecture and game sessions helped participants better understand cascades of trait-mediated interactions.

Participants’ debriefings confirmed qualitatively that they learned that beneficial organisms and interactions occur on their farms, and that gaming was enjoyable, motivating, and critical to grasp complex interactions. Many of the farmers concluded that the outcome of these interactions is not unique and not always in favor of rust control but is context dependent. Many concluded that there are feasible things they can do on their farms, derived from what they learned, to favor potential autonomous pest control.


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Azteca chess: gamifying a complex ecological process of autonomous pest control in shade coffee
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 232 (September 2016), p. 190–198 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Science-based board games can help people grasp the ecological complexity of autonomous pest control (APC) in the shade-coffee agroecosystem. Azteca Chess is a board-game that captures in a stylized way the fascinating natural history and the dynamics of a complex network of direct, indirect and cascading trait-mediated interactions among five species of arthropods dwelling in shade coffee bushes (a coffee-scale, an ant, an adult and larval lady beetle, a parasitoid wasp and a parasitoid fly). In exchange for honey-dew, the Azteca ant protects scale-insects that help control the devastating coffee-rust disease. The ant repels the adult ladybeetle but inadvertently protects its larvae, which devour scales to local extinction. The head-hunting fly paralyzes Azteca and opens a window of opportunity for the adult beetle to oviposit under scales, but also for a parasitoid wasp to kill the beetle larvae. Interactions can cascade or not towards APC. Experimental test-driving shows Azteca Chess meets good modeling and game-design standards and is proved statistically to enhance understanding and application of relevant complex ecological processes.


7.
Artículo
Simplification of a coffee foliage-dwelling beetle community under low-shade management
Gordon, Caleb E. ; McGill, Brian J. (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Basic and Applied Ecology Vol. 10, no. 3 (May 2009), p. 246-254 ISSN: 1439-1791
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés | Alemán |
Resumen en inglés

Coffee agroforests may be structurally and floristically complex and may contain a significant fraction of species from biodiverse and threatened tropical montane forest biotas; hence, understanding the dynamics of tropical forest biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems has emerged as a centrally important area of tropical conservation biology research. We conducted a morphospecies analysis on foliage-dwelling beetles collected from coffee plants on four coffee farms in southern Chiapas, Mexico, to characterize variation in the abundance, species richness, and species composition of this mega-diverse taxon in relation to coffee cultivation system, spatio-temporal variation, and predator removal. We constructed thirty-two cages to exclude birds and bats on four farms, each enclosing 7–10 coffee plants and paired with an adjacent uncaged control plot, and then collected beetles from coffee foliage with D-Vac aspirators in each plot once every 3 months for one year.

We classified the 2662 beetles collected into 293 morphospecies, representing 42 families of beetles. Extrapolation and interpolation analyses revealed a very high level of species richness, with no plateau and only a slight leveling trend observed in our species accumulation curves. We found that low-shade systems contain equal or higher beetle abundance, lower species richness, more highly homogenized species composition, and higher abundance of coffee berry borer pests on coffee foliage than do high-shade systems. We observed no effect of flying vertebrate exclusion on the coffee foliage beetle assemblage, but did find significant variation in abundance, species richness, and species composition of coffee foliage beetles across seasons and study sites. The increased beetle biodiversity of high-shade coffee cultivation systems has important implications both for the preservation of native biodiversity in coffee growing regions and for the control of agricultural pests such as the coffee berry borer.

Resumen en alemán

Kaffee-Agrarwälder können strukturell und floristisch komplex sein und können einen signifikanten Anteil von Arten aus biodiversen und gefährdeten tropischen montanen Waldbiotopen enthalten. Deshalb hat sich das Verständnis der Dynamik der tropischen Waldbiodiversität in Kaffee-Agrarökosystemen als ein zentrales Gebiet der Forschung in der tropischen Naturschutzbiologie entwickelt. Wir führten eine Morphospezies-Untersuchung an laubbewohnenden Käfern durch, die auf Kaffeepflanzen in vier Kaffeefarmen im südlichen Chiapas, Mexiko, gesammelt wurden, um die Variation in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung dieses megadiversen Taxons in Bezug zu setzen zum Kaffee-Anbausystem, zur raumzeitlichen Variation und zur Entfernung der Prädatoren. Wir konstruierten 32 Käfige um Vögel und Fledermäuse auf vier Farmen auszuschließen, von denen jeder 7-10 Kaffeepflanzen enthielt, und bildeten Paare mit naheliegenden, nicht eingeschlossenen Kontrollflächen. Wir sammelten dann in jeder Fläche über ein Jahr lang einmal in drei Monaten die Käfer mit einem D-Vac-Saugapparat von den Kaffeeblättern. Wir klassifizierten die 2662 gesammelten Käfer in 293 Morphospecies, die 42 Käferfamilien repräsentierten.

Extrapolations- und Intrapolationsanalysen ließen einen sehr hohen Grad des Artenreichtums erkennen, und die Artenakkumulationskurven verliefen ohne Plateau und nur mit einer leicht abfallenden Steigung. Wir fanden, dass Systeme mit wenig Schatten eine ähnliche oder höhere Käferabundanz, einen geringeren Artenreichtum, eine viel stärker homogene Artenzusammensetzung und eine höhere Abundanz von Schädlingen, die sich in Kaffeebohnen vermehren, aufweisen als Systeme mit viel Schatten. Wir fanden keine Auswirkung des Ausschlusses von fliegenden Vertebraten auf die Käferzusammensetzung auf den Kaffeeblättern. Wir fanden jedoch eine signifikante Veränderung in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung der Käfer auf den Kaffeeblättern mit der Jahreszeit und in den Untersuchungsgebieten. Die erhöhte Käferdiversität der schattigen Kaffeepflanzungen hat wichtige Implikationen sowohl für die Erhaltung der vorhandenen Biodiversität in Kaffeeanbauregionen, als auch für die Kontrolle von landwirtschaftlichen Schädlingen, wie dem Kaffeebohnenbohrer.


8.
Libro
Arthropod diversity and conservation / edited by David L. Hawksworth and Alan T. Bull
Disponible en línea: Arthropod diversity and conservation.
Hawksworth, David L. (editor) ; Bull, Alan T. (editor) ;
Dordrecht, The Netherlands : Springer , c2006
Disponible en línea
Clasificación: 632.65 / A7
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010015069 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

9.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Seasonal shift in the foraging niche of a tropical avian resident: resource competition at work?
Jedlicka, Julie A. ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 22, no. 4 (July 2006 ), p. 419-429 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B9155 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Este estudio examinó el comportamiento de forrajeo de un ave residente, Basileuterus rufifrons (RCWA), en una finca de café con sombra en Chiapas, México. A diferencia de muchas aves residentes que usan los agroecosistemas de café con sombra solamante durante una estación, RCWAs no se van a otros hábitats cuando los aves migrantes están presente. El forrajeo de RCWA fue comparado cuando las aves migrantes eran presente (la época seca) y ausente (la época de lluvia). La hipótesis fue que los RCWA exhibirían un cambio de forrajeo con los cambios de estaciones a causa de la competencia de recursos con los migrantes. Observaciones en el docel y el sotobosque en un cafetal muestran que durante la época de lluvia, los RCWAs forrajean igualmente en los dos niveles de vegetación, pero tienen más éxito forrajeando en el docel. Durante la época seca, los migrantes forrajean principalmente en el docel y los RCWAs se mueven al sotobosque donde efectúan 80% de las maniobras de forrajeo. Durante ese tiempo, los RCWAs tuvieron menos éxito forrajeando tanto en el docel como en el sotobosque. Durante la época seca el número de artrópodos bajó entre 47–79% en el docel y entre 4–5% en el sotobosque a causa de la depredación de las aves. En el docel, la disponibilidad de artrópodos grandes (>5 mm en longitud) bajó en un 58% de la época de lluvia a la época seca. Tales reducciones de recursos podrían causar el cambio de lugar a forrajeo observado en RCWA, pero otras explicaciones e hipótesis son discutidas. Pueden ser que este cambio de forrajeo sea común en algunas aves residentes pequeñas que comen artrópodos para evitar la competencia con los migrantes durante la época seca

Resumen en inglés

This study examined the foraging behaviour of a resident bird species, the rufous-capped warbler (RCWA, Basileuterus rufifrons), in a shaded-coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. Unlike many resident species that use shaded-coffee agroecosystems seasonally, RCWAs do not move to other habitats when migrants are present. RCWA foraging was compared when migrant birds were present (dry season) and absent (wet season). It was hypothesized that RCWAs would exhibit a seasonal foraging niche shift because of resource competition with migrants. Observations from both the canopy and coffee understorey show that RCWAs foraged almost equally in both vegetative layers during the wet season although they were more successful foraging in the canopy. In the dry season, migrants foraged primarily in the canopy and RCWAs shifted so that 80% of RCWA foraging manoeuvres were in the understorey. At that time RCWAs foraged less successfully in both vegetative layers. Avian predation in the dry season was found to reduce densities of arthropods by 47-79% in the canopy, as opposed to 4-5% in the understorey. In the canopy, availability of large (>5 mm in length) arthropods decreased by 58% from the wet to dry season. Such resource reductions could have caused the RCWA foraging niche shift yet other alternative or additional hypotheses are discussed. Shifts in foraging niche may be a widespread mechanism for some small insectivorous residents to avoid seasonal competition with abundant migrant species.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Response of ground spiders to local and landscape factors in a Mexican coffee landscape
Marín, Linda (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ; De la Mora, Aldo (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Tryban, Stephen (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 222, (April 2016), p. 80–92 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In order to secure the provisioning of ecosystem services, detailed analyses of the relationship between biodiversity and agriculture are required. We studied ground spider diversity in a 52 km² coffee landscape in Southern Mexico, and asked the following questions. (1) How do coffee management variables and local microhabitat variables change among coffee agroecosystems and forest sites and across seasons? (2) How does coffee management affect ground spider richness, abundance, and composition? (3) How do local and landscape factors in fl uence ground spider richness and abundance? and (4) What role does seasonality play in shaping ground spider communities? During the dry season and rainy season of 2011 we sampled ground active spiders using pitfall traps from high and low shade coffee agroecosystems (27 sites) and from forest (10 sites). On local scale, for each 20 m × 20 m site we measured leaf litter variables, invertebrate dry biomass, slope of the terrain and elevation, and management variables such as canopy cover, shade tree richness, shade tree density and proportion of Inga trees. At the landscape scale, we measured distance to the nearest forest and percent of forest in buffers of 500 m. Results show that agricultural management had a strong influence on spider richness and abundance. Across seasons, local spider richness and abundance had or tended to have higher values in the low-shade coffee. Spider richness and abundance were strongly in fl uenced by physiographic and local predictors and weakly by landscape predictors. Furthermore, predictors varied with seasonality, with slope of the terrain being the strongest predictor in the dry season and canopy cover being the strongest predictor in the rainy season. We conclude that ground active spiders in this coffee landscape are greatly in fl uenced by coffee management and local characteristics.