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37 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Perfecto, Ivette
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1.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Aboveground biomass accumulation in a tropical wet forest in Nicaragua following a catastrophic hurricane disturbance
Mascaro, Joseph ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Barros, Oton (coaut.) ; Boucher, Douglas H. (coaut.) ; Granzow de la Cerda, Iñigo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 37, no. 4 (December 2005), p. 600-608 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B8693 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF

2.
Libro
Actas del simposio café y biodiversidad / editores: Alex Monro y María Carmen Peña Chocarro
Congreso de la Sociedad Mesoamericana para la Biología y la Conservación (5 : 2001 : San Salvador) ; Monro, Alex (ed.) ; Peña Chocarro, María Carmen (coed.) ;
San Salvador, El Salvador : The Natural History Museum :: Universidad de El Salvador , 2002
Clasificación: F/633.730972 / C6
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020007883 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

3.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
Alianza de Mujeres en Agroecología (AMA-AWA): fortaleciendo vínculos entre académicas para el escalamiento de la agroecología
Morales, H. ; Zuluaga Sánchez, Gloria Patricia (coaut.) ; González Santiago, María Virginia (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Papuccio de Vidal, Silvia (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agroecología en femenino. Reflexiones a partir de nuestras experiencias La Paz, Bolivia : Sociedad Científica Latinoamericana de Agroecología, 2018 página 15-33 ISBN:978-99974-0-310-0
PDF

4.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Ants (Azteca sp.) as potential biological control agents in shade coffee production in Chiapas, Mexico
Vandermeer, John ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Phillpott, Stacy (coaut.) ; García Ballinas, José Álvaro (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/633.73996 / A5
Contenido en: Agroforestry Systems Vol. 56, no. 3 (2002), p. 271-276 ISSN: 0167-4366
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B2880 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013013 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The role of Azteca sp. ants as potential biological control agents was studied in an organic coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. Individual larvae of Pieris rapae were placed on trees with artificially enhanced ant activity and both time to disappearance of the larvae and ant activity were recorded. There was a general negative relationship between time to disappearance and ant activity. A census of spiders was made of coffee bushes with and without foraging Azteca, encountering a negative relationship between ants and spiders. These results indicate that Azteca ants have potential as pests through their positive effect on scale insects, but also have potential as biological control agents, through their negative effect on potential herbivores. Furthermore, the correlation between ant and spider densities suggests a complicated relationship between these two predatory organisms, implying a more complicated food web structure than simply ants, homoptera and other herbivores.


5.
Libro
Arthropod diversity and conservation / edited by David L. Hawksworth and Alan T. Bull
Disponible en línea: Arthropod diversity and conservation.
Hawksworth, David L. (editor) ; Bull, Alan T. (editor) ;
Dordrecht, The Netherlands : Springer , c2006
Disponible en línea
Clasificación: 632.65 / A7
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010015069 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Azteca chess: gamifying a complex ecological process of autonomous pest control in shade coffee
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 232 (September 2016), p. 190–198 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Science-based board games can help people grasp the ecological complexity of autonomous pest control (APC) in the shade-coffee agroecosystem. Azteca Chess is a board-game that captures in a stylized way the fascinating natural history and the dynamics of a complex network of direct, indirect and cascading trait-mediated interactions among five species of arthropods dwelling in shade coffee bushes (a coffee-scale, an ant, an adult and larval lady beetle, a parasitoid wasp and a parasitoid fly). In exchange for honey-dew, the Azteca ant protects scale-insects that help control the devastating coffee-rust disease. The ant repels the adult ladybeetle but inadvertently protects its larvae, which devour scales to local extinction. The head-hunting fly paralyzes Azteca and opens a window of opportunity for the adult beetle to oviposit under scales, but also for a parasitoid wasp to kill the beetle larvae. Interactions can cascade or not towards APC. Experimental test-driving shows Azteca Chess meets good modeling and game-design standards and is proved statistically to enhance understanding and application of relevant complex ecological processes.


7.
- Artículo con arbitraje
The Azteca chess experience: learning how to share concepts of ecological complexity with small coffee farmers
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Cruz Morales, Juana (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology and Society Vol. 22, no. 2, Art. 37 (Jun 2017), p. 1-20 ISSN: 1708-3087
PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Small-scale coffee farmers understand certain complex ecological processes, and successfully navigate some of the challenges emerging from the ecological complexity on their farms. It is generally thought that scientific knowledge is able to complement farmers’ knowledge. However, for this collaboration to be fruitful, the gap between the knowledge frameworks of both farmers and scientists will need to be closed. We report on the learning results of 14 workshops held in Chiapas, Mexico during 2015 in which 117 small-scale coffee farmers of all genders (30% women) and ages who had little schooling were exposed by researchers to a natural history narrative, a multispecies network representation, a board game, and a series of graphical quizzes, all related to a nine-species complex ecological network with potential for autonomous control of the ongoing and devastating coffee rust epidemic that was affecting them. Farmers’ retention and understanding of direct and indirect bilateral interactions among organisms was assessed with different methods to elucidate the effect of adding Azteca Chess gaming sessions to a detailed and very graphical lecture. Evaluation methods that were better adapted to farmers’ conditions improved learning scores and showed statistically significant age effect (players older than 40 had lower retention scores) and gaming effect (lower retention of interactions included in the lecture but not in the game). The combination of lecture and game sessions helped participants better understand cascades of trait-mediated interactions.

Participants’ debriefings confirmed qualitatively that they learned that beneficial organisms and interactions occur on their farms, and that gaming was enjoyable, motivating, and critical to grasp complex interactions. Many of the farmers concluded that the outcome of these interactions is not unique and not always in favor of rust control but is context dependent. Many concluded that there are feasible things they can do on their farms, derived from what they learned, to favor potential autonomous pest control.


8.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity and the transformation of a tropical agroecosystems: ants in coffee plantations
Perfecto, Ivette (autora) ; Snelling, Roy R. (autor) ;
Contenido en: Ecological Applications Vol. 5, no. 4 (November 1995), p. 1084-1097 ISSN: 1051-0761
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
28329-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Studies of biological diversity have focused mainly on undisturbed ecosystems, effectively neglecting potential losses due to changes in areas already altered by human intervention. In this study we test the hypothesis that measures of biological diversity change significantly with changes in agricultural practices. In particular, we examine differences in measures of ant species diversity correlated with changes in vegetational complexity associated with the modernization of Costa Rica's coffee agroecosystem. We examine patterns of within-habitat α and between-habitat β diversity in the ant community. Ants were sampled in 16 coffee farms falling on a gradient of vegetational and structural complexity. Percentage of shade created by the canopy was used as an index of vegetational complexity. As a partial indicator of the food resource base, arthropods were sampled using pitfall traps. The diversity (S, H', and E) of ground-foraging ants decreased significantly with the reduction of vegetational diversity. However, no significant changes were recorded for the diversity of the ants on the surface of coffee bushes. Similarity indices (I) showed a high degree of similarity among ant communities in coffee monocultures but a low degree of similarity among farms with high vegetational diversity. We discuss several possible mechanisms leading to reduced ant diversity. Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.2307/2269356


9.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity loss in Latin American coffee landscapes: review of the evidence on ants, birds, and trees
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Arendt, Wayne J. (coaut.) ; Armbrecht, Inge (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Diestch, Thomas V. (coaut.) ; Gordon, Caleb (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Reynoso Santos, Roberto (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ; Tejeda Cruz, César (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Valenzuela González, Jorge Ernesto (coaut.) ; Zolotoff, José Manuel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 22, no. 5 (October 2008), p. 1093-1105 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46889-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en español

Diversos estudios han documentado las pérdidas de biodiversidad debido a la intensificación del manejo de café (disminución de la riqueza y complejidad del dosel). Sin embargo, persisten preguntas sobre la sensibilidad relativa de diferentes taxa, especialistas de hábitat y grupos funcionales, y sí las implicaciones para la conservación de la biodiversidad varían entre regiones. Revisamos cuantitativamente los datos de estudios de biodiversidad de hormigas, aves y árboles en agroecosistemas de café para abordar las siguientes preguntas: ¿La riqueza de especies declina con la intensificación o con las características individuales de la vegetación?¿Hay pérdidas significativas de riqueza de especies en los sistemas cafetaleros en comparación con los bosques?¿Es mayor la pérdida en especies de bosque o en grupos funcionales particulares? y ¿Las aves o las hormigas son más afectadas por la intensificación? En los estudios revisados, la riqueza de hormigas y aves declinó con la intensificación del manejo y con los cambios de vegetación. La riqueza de especies de todas las hormigas y aves y la de especies de hormigas y aves de bosque fue menor en la mayoría de los agroecosistemas cafetaleros que en los bosques, pero el café rústico (cultivado bajo dosel de bosque nativo) sustentó la mayor pérdida de especies, y la pérdida de especies de hormigas, aves y árboles de bosque aumentó con la intensificación del manejo.

Las pérdidas de especies de hormigas y aves fueron similares, aunque las pérdidas de hormigas de bosque fueron más drásticas en el café rústico. La riqueza de especies de aves migratorias y de aves que forrajean en varios estratos de vegetación fueron menos afectadas por la intensificación que las especies residentes de dosel y de sotobosque. Las fincas rústicas protegieron más especies que otros sistemas cafetaleros, y la pérdida de especies dependió mayormente de la especialización de hábitat y de los atributos funcionales. Recomendamos que el bosque sea protegido, se promueva el café rústico y se restauren las fincas intensivas mediante el incremento de la densidad y riqueza de árboles nativos y permitiendo el crecimiento de epífitas. También recomendamos que las futuras investigaciones enfoquen las compensaciones potenciales entre la conservación de la biodiversidad y la forma de vida de los campesinos que producen café.

Resumen en inglés

Studies have documented biodiversity losses due to intensification of coffee management (reduction in canopy richness and complexity). Nevertheless, questions remain regarding relative sensitivity of different taxa, habitat specialists, and functional groups, and whether implications for biodiversity conservation vary across regions.We quantitatively reviewed data from ant, bird, and tree biodiversity studies in coffee agroecosystems to address the following questions: Does species richness decline with intensification or with individual vegetation characteristics? Are there significant losses of species richness in coffee-management systems compared with forests? Is species loss greater for forest species or for particular functional groups?and Are ants or birds more strongly affected by intensification? Across studies, ant and bird richness declined with management intensification and with changes in vegetation. Species richness of all ants and birds and of forest ant and bird species was lower in most coffee agroecosystems than in forests, but rustic coffee (grown under native forest canopies) had equal or greater ant and bird richness than nearby forests.

Sun coffee(grown without canopy trees) sustained the highest species losses, and species loss of forest ant, bird, and tree species increased with management intensity. Losses of ant and bird species were similar, although losses of forest ants were more drastic in rustic coffee. Richness of migratory birds and of birds that forage across vegetation strata was less affected by intensification than richness of resident, canopy, and understory bird species. Rustic farms protected more species than other coffee systems, and loss of species depended greatly on habitat specialization and functional traits. We recommend that forest be protected, rustic coffee be promoted,and intensive coffee farms be restored by augmenting native tree density and richness and allowing growth of epiphytes. We also recommend that future research focus on potential trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and farmer livelihoods stemming from coffee production.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Biodiversity, yield, and shade coffee certification
Perfecto, Ivette ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Mas, Alex (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ;
Clasificación: AR/633.73072 / B5
Contenido en: Ecological Economics No. 54 (2005), p. 435-446
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010009096 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020008371 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The current crisis in the coffee market provides an opportunity to explore alternative markets. In Latin America, coffee is traditionally produced under a diverse and dense canopy of shade trees. The structural and floristic diversity contained therein harbors a high biodiversity of associated organisms. The recent trend of reducing this shade cover so as to increase production raises concerns about the potential loss of biodiversity. This concern has given rise to a variety of conservation programs, including shade coffee certification, a market-based conservation strategy. Shade coffee certification programs offer the opportunity to link environmental and economic goals. Although the idea of shade certification is to compensate farmers for the biodiversity conservation service provided by their shaded plantations, the premium offered may not compensate for the low yields of the most shaded plantations. Here we present an approach for guiding the establishment of premium prices for coffee producers based on scientific information that relates shade percentage and levels of species richness with yield. Partial data from two separate studies in Chiapas, Mexico, are combined and used to illustrate this approach. In addition, further theoretical explorations are made by adapting an intercropping model and using coffee yield and biodiversity (as it relates to percent of shade of canopy trees) as the two relevant variables. This model is examined qualitatively from the point of view of optimality (balancing biodiversity preservation with production). Results suggest that price premium for shade certification should be high and go directly to the producers, especially if the intent is to conserve forest-sensitive species.