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37 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Perfecto, Ivette
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1.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
Alianza de Mujeres en Agroecología (AMA-AWA): fortaleciendo vínculos entre académicas para el escalamiento de la agroecología
Morales, H. ; Zuluaga Sánchez, Gloria Patricia (coaut.) ; González Santiago, María Virginia (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Papuccio de Vidal, Silvia (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agroecología en femenino. Reflexiones a partir de nuestras experiencias La Paz, Bolivia : Sociedad Científica Latinoamericana de Agroecología, 2018 página 15-33 ISBN:978-99974-0-310-0
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2.
- Artículo con arbitraje
The Azteca chess experience: learning how to share concepts of ecological complexity with small coffee farmers
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Cruz Morales, Juana (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology and Society Vol. 22, no. 2, Art. 37 (Jun 2017), p. 1-20 ISSN: 1708-3087
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Small-scale coffee farmers understand certain complex ecological processes, and successfully navigate some of the challenges emerging from the ecological complexity on their farms. It is generally thought that scientific knowledge is able to complement farmers’ knowledge. However, for this collaboration to be fruitful, the gap between the knowledge frameworks of both farmers and scientists will need to be closed. We report on the learning results of 14 workshops held in Chiapas, Mexico during 2015 in which 117 small-scale coffee farmers of all genders (30% women) and ages who had little schooling were exposed by researchers to a natural history narrative, a multispecies network representation, a board game, and a series of graphical quizzes, all related to a nine-species complex ecological network with potential for autonomous control of the ongoing and devastating coffee rust epidemic that was affecting them. Farmers’ retention and understanding of direct and indirect bilateral interactions among organisms was assessed with different methods to elucidate the effect of adding Azteca Chess gaming sessions to a detailed and very graphical lecture. Evaluation methods that were better adapted to farmers’ conditions improved learning scores and showed statistically significant age effect (players older than 40 had lower retention scores) and gaming effect (lower retention of interactions included in the lecture but not in the game). The combination of lecture and game sessions helped participants better understand cascades of trait-mediated interactions.

Participants’ debriefings confirmed qualitatively that they learned that beneficial organisms and interactions occur on their farms, and that gaming was enjoyable, motivating, and critical to grasp complex interactions. Many of the farmers concluded that the outcome of these interactions is not unique and not always in favor of rust control but is context dependent. Many concluded that there are feasible things they can do on their farms, derived from what they learned, to favor potential autonomous pest control.


3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Azteca chess: gamifying a complex ecological process of autonomous pest control in shade coffee
García Barrios, Luis Enrique ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 232 (September 2016), p. 190–198 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Science-based board games can help people grasp the ecological complexity of autonomous pest control (APC) in the shade-coffee agroecosystem. Azteca Chess is a board-game that captures in a stylized way the fascinating natural history and the dynamics of a complex network of direct, indirect and cascading trait-mediated interactions among five species of arthropods dwelling in shade coffee bushes (a coffee-scale, an ant, an adult and larval lady beetle, a parasitoid wasp and a parasitoid fly). In exchange for honey-dew, the Azteca ant protects scale-insects that help control the devastating coffee-rust disease. The ant repels the adult ladybeetle but inadvertently protects its larvae, which devour scales to local extinction. The head-hunting fly paralyzes Azteca and opens a window of opportunity for the adult beetle to oviposit under scales, but also for a parasitoid wasp to kill the beetle larvae. Interactions can cascade or not towards APC. Experimental test-driving shows Azteca Chess meets good modeling and game-design standards and is proved statistically to enhance understanding and application of relevant complex ecological processes.


4.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Response of ground spiders to local and landscape factors in a Mexican coffee landscape
Marín, Linda (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut.) ; De la Mora, Aldo (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Tryban, Stephen (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment Vol. 222, (April 2016), p. 80–92 ISSN: 0167-8809
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

In order to secure the provisioning of ecosystem services, detailed analyses of the relationship between biodiversity and agriculture are required. We studied ground spider diversity in a 52 km² coffee landscape in Southern Mexico, and asked the following questions. (1) How do coffee management variables and local microhabitat variables change among coffee agroecosystems and forest sites and across seasons? (2) How does coffee management affect ground spider richness, abundance, and composition? (3) How do local and landscape factors in fl uence ground spider richness and abundance? and (4) What role does seasonality play in shaping ground spider communities? During the dry season and rainy season of 2011 we sampled ground active spiders using pitfall traps from high and low shade coffee agroecosystems (27 sites) and from forest (10 sites). On local scale, for each 20 m × 20 m site we measured leaf litter variables, invertebrate dry biomass, slope of the terrain and elevation, and management variables such as canopy cover, shade tree richness, shade tree density and proportion of Inga trees. At the landscape scale, we measured distance to the nearest forest and percent of forest in buffers of 500 m. Results show that agricultural management had a strong influence on spider richness and abundance. Across seasons, local spider richness and abundance had or tended to have higher values in the low-shade coffee. Spider richness and abundance were strongly in fl uenced by physiographic and local predictors and weakly by landscape predictors. Furthermore, predictors varied with seasonality, with slope of the terrain being the strongest predictor in the dry season and canopy cover being the strongest predictor in the rainy season. We conclude that ground active spiders in this coffee landscape are greatly in fl uenced by coffee management and local characteristics.


5.
Libro
Coffee agroecology: a new approach to unferstanding agricultural biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainable development / Ivette Perfecto and John Vandermeer
Perfecto, Ivette ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ;
London : Routledge , 2015
Clasificación: 338.17373 / P4
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010015515 (Disponible) , ECO010017871 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013449 (Disponible) , ECO020013225 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Based on principles of the conservation and optimization of biodiversity and of equity and sustainability, this book focuses on the ecology of the coffee agroecosystem as a model for a sustainable agricultural ecosystem. It draws on the authors’ own research conducted over the last twenty years as well as incorporating the vast literature that has been generated on coffee agroecosystems from around the world. The book uses an integrated approach that weaves together various lines of research to understand the ecology of a very diverse tropical agroforestry system. Key concepts explored include biodiversity patterns, metapopulation dynamics and ecological networks. These are all set in a socioeconomic and political framework which relates them to the realities of farmers’ livelihoods. The authors provide a novel synthesis that will generate new understanding and can be applied to other examples of sustainable agriculture and food production. This synthesis also explains the ecosystem services provided by the approach, including the economic, fair trade and political aspects surrounding this all-important global commodity.

Índice

List of figures
List of tables
Preface
1 Wake up and smell the coffee (or a tale of two farms)
Introduction
Example 1. the farm as a component of industrial eriterpriie
Example 2: the farm as part ofriature
The philosophical/methodo1ogical approach of this book
The coffee agroecosystem as a model system
2 A biodiverse cup of coffee: coffee agroforests as repositories of tropical biodiversity
Background to biodiversity
Taxonomic biases
Geographic bias
The agricultural connection
Not all agriculture is the same
Historical roots of agricultura1 transformation and biodiversity loss
Biodiversity on the farm
Intensification and biodiveriity: coffee as a model system
The intensification gradient in coffee
Costa Rira, coffee intensification and biodiversity: a case study
Three decader of biodiversity research in coffee agoecosystems
Pioneering biodiversity research in the coffee agroecosystem
Biodiversity loss and coffee intensification: what causes the pattern?
Balancing ecological and economic variables: optimality under constan conditions
3 The coffee agroecosystem as a high-quality matrix
The coffee system and biodiversity debates
Bringing dynamics into the picture
Foundational arguments
The ubiquitousness of extinctions
Interfragment migrations
The dynamics of extinctions and migrations in fragmented habitats: a theoretical approach
Landscape structure and interfragment dynamics
The basic elements of the matrix
A meanjield approach to propagating sinks and ephemeral sources
Conclusion
4 Space matters: large-scale spatial ecology within the coffee agroecosystem
What do the spots of the jaguar and the distribution of ants on a coffee plantation have in common?
Spatial patterns, power functions and the Turing process in the ant Azteca
Spatial patterns: Turing on the farm
Pattern and powerfunctions
Implications of spatial patterns for system dynamics

Source-sink populations and metapopulations
Coccus viridis: a metapopulation or a source-sink population?
The great transformation
Population density
The idea of regime change
Changes in spatial patterns of Azteca
Regime change and the assumed Turing suppressor
Alternatives for the suppressive force: food web elements
The Effect of a Fungal Disease on Spatial Patterns
The Effect of a Myrmecophilous Beetle on Spatial Patterns
Summary
5 Who's eating whom and how: trophic and trait-mediated cascades in the coffee agroecosystem
Birds: from icons of biodiversity to functional components of agroecosystems
Omnivory and its place in food web structure
Theoretical framework: omnivory and its relatives
Theoretical framework: coupled oscillators
Herbivores and their arthropod and vertebrate predators
Teasing out the trophir structure in the coffee agroecosystem
Trait-mediated effects in food webs
What is trait mediation?
Conceptualizing trait-mediated effects as fundamental non-linearities
The complicated system of trait-mediated interactions associated with the Azteca ant
Trait-mediated indirect effects as coupling agents in food webs
6 Interactions across spatial scales
Introduction
Small-scale patterns in the ant community
Ecological competition and spatial pattern: the theory
Natural history and spatial pattern: the special case of ants
The major players in small-scale structuring
The nature of the small-scale spatial pattern
Interaction of the two spatial patterns and consequences for biological control
Ants as predators of coffee pests
The dialectics of predation and spatial structure
7 Biodiversity and ecosystem services
Introduction: the nature of ecosystem services
Pest management
Our approach
Vertebrate insectivores
Ants as predators
Azteca and the pest control complex
The Green Coffee Scale and the Myrmecophylous Beetle
The Coffee Rust Disease
The Coffee Leaf Miner

The Pest Control Complex I
Connecting Azteca With the Other ant Predators
The Pest Control Complex II
Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change
Pollination Services
Bees and Coffee Yield
Interactions between Pollinators and Other Organisms
Conclusion
8 Coffee, the agroecological landscape and farmers' livelihoods
The interpenetration of farmers' and biodiversity issues
The historical trajectory of biodiversity conservation in tropical lands
The key biodiversity versus agriculture debates (SLOSS, FT, LSLS)
The key farming debates: the ideology of "intensification"
The matrix quality model
The importance of extinction in the matrix model
What is in the matrix?
Connecting the matrix to broader socioeconomic structures
An alternative framework: the New Rurality
The convergence of food production with nature conservation
9 Syndromes of coffee production: embracing sustainability
Syndromes of production as ecological regimes
Dynamic background for syndromes
The theory
Educating the intuition about Q
The case of coffee syndromes
Self-generating dynamics of agricultural syndromes
Biodiversity and function, conservation and matrix quality: the ecology and political ecology of coffee syndromes
Referentes Index


6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
A positive association between ants and spiders and potential mechanisms driving the pattern
Marín, Linda ; Jackson, Doug (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Oikos Vol. 124, no. 8 (August 2015), p. 1078–1088 ISSN: 0030-1299
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Biotic interactions play a central role in determining species distribution and abundance. Some ants act as keystone species affecting the distribution and abundance of other species, including spiders. In coffee plantations Pocobletus sp. spiders are significantly more abundant in coffee plants patrolled by the aggressive arboreal ants Azteca sericeasur. However, it is unknown if other ant species influence this ant–spider association, how these associates are spatially distributed, and which are the potential drivers of this association. Here we examine the influence of ants, Azteca sericeasur and Pheidole synanthropica, and coffee branch density on Pocobletus abundance in a coffee farm in southern Mexico. We also analyze the spatial distribution and abundance of Pocobletus sp., in relation to the spatial distribution of A. sericeasur and P. synanthropica. Finally, we examine prey availability and enemy-free space as potential mechanisms underlying this ant–spider association. Results show that Pocobletus abundance is positively correlated with coffee branch density and A. sericeasur and P. synanthropica presence. Furthermore, the spatial distribution analysis shows that in 20  20 m plots Pocobletus is strongly associated to A. sericeasur, but not to P. synanthropica. Results show that insect abundance in both Pocobletus’s webs and sticky traps was significantly higher in the presence of A. sericeasur whereas the abundance of the predators of Pocobletus decreased in A. sericeasur’s presence; suggesting positive direct and indirect effects of A. sericeasur on Pocobletus. Overall, this study highlights the strong influence of ants and plant characteristics on the abundance and spatial distribution of spiders as well their indirect effects on other taxa.


7.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Effects of agricultural intensification on the assemblage of leaf-nosed bats (Phyllostomidae) in a coffee landscape in Chiapas, Mexico
Williams Guillén, Kimberly ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 42, no. 5 (September 2010), p. 605-613 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
49945-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The agricultural matrix surrounding forested areas serves critical functions as dispersal corridors and alternate habitat for wildlife. Agricultural intensification, however, can reduce the conservation value of these areas. To evaluate the effects of agroecosystem management on bat assemblages, we studied the abundance and diversity of leaf-nosed bats (family: Phyllostomidae) in southwestern Chiapas, Mexico, a landscape dominated by shade coffee agroforestry. During 2104 mist-net hour (MNH), we captured 3167 bats of 27 phyllostomid species. Total species richness in each land-use type varied from 24 species in forest fragments to 22 species in commercial shade polycultures. Although the cumulative observed species richness showed little change in response to management intensity, the number of bats captured per MNH declined significantly in the more intensively managed (i.e., low-shade monocultures) plantations. Intensively managed coffee plantations had lower phyllostomid diversity and species similarity, and had lower proportions of nectarivorous and animalivorous bats. Among frugivores, the proportion of large (>25 g) frugivores captured increased with management intensity. Recapture frequency was significantly higher than expected in forest fragments, and lower than expected in more intensively managed coffee. Our results suggest that less intensively managed coffee agroforests can serve as valuable feeding and commuting areas for most leaf-nosed bats, and that maintaining forest fragments in agricultural landscapes contributes to bat diversity. Declines in populations of gleaning insectivores, however, could compromise natural suppression of insect pests in these agricultural areas.



9.
Libro
Nature's matrix: linking agriculture, conservation and food sovereignty / Ivette Perfecto, John Vandermeer and Angus Wright
Perfecto, Ivette ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Wright, Angus (coaut.) ;
London, England : Earthscan Publications Ltd. , 2009
Clasificación: 333.9516 / P44
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010017594 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020011487 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Landscapes are frequently seen as fragments of natural habitat surrounded by a "sea" of agriculture. But recent ecological theory shows that the nature of these fragments is not nearly as important for conservation as is the nature of the matrix of agriculture that surrounds them. Local extinctions from conservation fragments are inevitable and must be balanced by migrations if massive extinction is to be avoided. High migration rates only occur in what the authors refer to as "high quality" matrices, which are created by alternative agroecological techniques, as opposed to the industrial monocultural model of agriculture. The authors, including SNRE Professor Ivette Perfecto, argue that the only way to promote such high quality matrices is to work with rural social movements. Their ideas are at odds with the major trends of some of the large conservation organizations that emphasize targeted land purchases of protected areas. They argue that recent advances in ecological research make such a general approach anachronistic and call, rather, for solidarity with the small farmers around the world who are currently struggling to attain food sovereignty. Nature's Matrix proposes a radically new approach to the conservation of biodiversity based on recent advances in the science of ecology plus political realities, particularly in the world's tropical regions.

Índice

List of figures and boxes
Preface
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
1 Matrix Matters: An Overview
The Birds of New York and the Coffee of Mesoamerica
The Argument
Towards a New Paradigm
Notes
2 The Ecological Argument
The Fundamental Patterns of Biodiversity
Why the Biodiversity Patterns Matter
The Ecological Background to Biodiversity Studies
Ecological Theory and Political Realities
Notes
3 The Agricultural Matrix
The Development of Agriculture
The Industrial Model
The Alternative Movement
Natural Systems Agriculture
Biodiversity as it Relates to Agro-ecology
Notes
4 The Broad Social Context for Understanding Biodiversity, Conservation and Agriculture
The Importance of the Deep Historical Context
Difficult Socio-political Issues in Practical Conservation Work
Sources of Systematic Bias in Conservation Practice
The Brazilian Amazon: A Case Study in Conservation, Livelihood and Social Movements
The Dependency Trap in Biodiversity Conservation
Grass Roots Social Movements
Notes
5 Coffee, Cacao and Food Crops: Case Studies of Agriculture and Biodiversity
Coffee and the Technical Side of Biodiversity
Cacao and Biodiversity: The Historical Development of a Biodiversity Landscape
The Production of Food and the Biodiversity Connection
Agricultural Potential in the Matrix
Notes
6 The New Paradigm
Recapping the Ecological Argument
Recapping the Agricultural Argument
Recapping the Social Movement Argument
Putting the Three Arguments Together
Notes
References
Index


10.
Artículo
Simplification of a coffee foliage-dwelling beetle community under low-shade management
Gordon, Caleb E. ; McGill, Brian J. (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Basic and Applied Ecology Vol. 10, no. 3 (May 2009), p. 246-254 ISSN: 1439-1791
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Resumen en: Inglés | Alemán |
Resumen en inglés

Coffee agroforests may be structurally and floristically complex and may contain a significant fraction of species from biodiverse and threatened tropical montane forest biotas; hence, understanding the dynamics of tropical forest biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems has emerged as a centrally important area of tropical conservation biology research. We conducted a morphospecies analysis on foliage-dwelling beetles collected from coffee plants on four coffee farms in southern Chiapas, Mexico, to characterize variation in the abundance, species richness, and species composition of this mega-diverse taxon in relation to coffee cultivation system, spatio-temporal variation, and predator removal. We constructed thirty-two cages to exclude birds and bats on four farms, each enclosing 7–10 coffee plants and paired with an adjacent uncaged control plot, and then collected beetles from coffee foliage with D-Vac aspirators in each plot once every 3 months for one year.

We classified the 2662 beetles collected into 293 morphospecies, representing 42 families of beetles. Extrapolation and interpolation analyses revealed a very high level of species richness, with no plateau and only a slight leveling trend observed in our species accumulation curves. We found that low-shade systems contain equal or higher beetle abundance, lower species richness, more highly homogenized species composition, and higher abundance of coffee berry borer pests on coffee foliage than do high-shade systems. We observed no effect of flying vertebrate exclusion on the coffee foliage beetle assemblage, but did find significant variation in abundance, species richness, and species composition of coffee foliage beetles across seasons and study sites. The increased beetle biodiversity of high-shade coffee cultivation systems has important implications both for the preservation of native biodiversity in coffee growing regions and for the control of agricultural pests such as the coffee berry borer.

Resumen en alemán

Kaffee-Agrarwälder können strukturell und floristisch komplex sein und können einen signifikanten Anteil von Arten aus biodiversen und gefährdeten tropischen montanen Waldbiotopen enthalten. Deshalb hat sich das Verständnis der Dynamik der tropischen Waldbiodiversität in Kaffee-Agrarökosystemen als ein zentrales Gebiet der Forschung in der tropischen Naturschutzbiologie entwickelt. Wir führten eine Morphospezies-Untersuchung an laubbewohnenden Käfern durch, die auf Kaffeepflanzen in vier Kaffeefarmen im südlichen Chiapas, Mexiko, gesammelt wurden, um die Variation in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung dieses megadiversen Taxons in Bezug zu setzen zum Kaffee-Anbausystem, zur raumzeitlichen Variation und zur Entfernung der Prädatoren. Wir konstruierten 32 Käfige um Vögel und Fledermäuse auf vier Farmen auszuschließen, von denen jeder 7-10 Kaffeepflanzen enthielt, und bildeten Paare mit naheliegenden, nicht eingeschlossenen Kontrollflächen. Wir sammelten dann in jeder Fläche über ein Jahr lang einmal in drei Monaten die Käfer mit einem D-Vac-Saugapparat von den Kaffeeblättern. Wir klassifizierten die 2662 gesammelten Käfer in 293 Morphospecies, die 42 Käferfamilien repräsentierten.

Extrapolations- und Intrapolationsanalysen ließen einen sehr hohen Grad des Artenreichtums erkennen, und die Artenakkumulationskurven verliefen ohne Plateau und nur mit einer leicht abfallenden Steigung. Wir fanden, dass Systeme mit wenig Schatten eine ähnliche oder höhere Käferabundanz, einen geringeren Artenreichtum, eine viel stärker homogene Artenzusammensetzung und eine höhere Abundanz von Schädlingen, die sich in Kaffeebohnen vermehren, aufweisen als Systeme mit viel Schatten. Wir fanden keine Auswirkung des Ausschlusses von fliegenden Vertebraten auf die Käferzusammensetzung auf den Kaffeeblättern. Wir fanden jedoch eine signifikante Veränderung in der Abundanz, im Artenreichtum und in der Artenzusammensetzung der Käfer auf den Kaffeeblättern mit der Jahreszeit und in den Untersuchungsgebieten. Die erhöhte Käferdiversität der schattigen Kaffeepflanzungen hat wichtige Implikationen sowohl für die Erhaltung der vorhandenen Biodiversität in Kaffeeanbauregionen, als auch für die Kontrolle von landwirtschaftlichen Schädlingen, wie dem Kaffeebohnenbohrer.


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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

En junio de 2008 convocamos un foro-taller en Chiapas, México para potencializar alianzas entre organizaciones campesinas, conservacionistas y académicos. Los ponentes trazaron la evolución de las relaciones entre sistemas productivos, bosques y biodiversidad desde la época prehispánica hasta la actual crisis de la economía neoliberal y la agricultura industrial. También delinearon un nuevo paradigma para la conservación en donde los campesinos son protagonistas. En grupos de trabajo, elaboramos propuestas para cimentar una agenda común entre los distintos sectores representados. Las redes de cooperación emergieron como estructuras para coordinar acción y facilitar el intercambio de información y apoyo a distintas escalas geográficas. Los mercados solidarios son la confluencia de diversos intereses en dónde se pueden constituir dichas redes. También identificamos algunos temas específicos de trabajo, entre ellos: los agrocombustibles y la soberanía energética, los servicios ambientales y la educación para el campo. La biodiversidad y la soberanía alimentaria y territorial son los ejes de esta agenda de cooperación, que forma parte de una lucha internacional para reconstruir nuestros sistemas alimenticios.

Resumen en inglés

In June, 2008, we convoked a forum and workshop in Chiapas, Mexico to strengthen alliances among farmers’ organizations, conservationists and academics. Speakers outlined the evolution of the relations among production systems, forests and biodiversity from the prehispanic era through the current crisis in the neoliberal economic model and industrial agriculture. They also framed a new conservation paradigm that prioritizes the role of farmers. We formed working groups that elaborated proposals for collaboration among the participating sectors. Cooperative networks emerged as appropriate structures for coordinating action and facilitating the exchange of information and support at various geographic scales. Solidarity-based markets are a venue where diverse interests converge, favoring the formation of such networks. We also identified some specific issues for collaboration, including: agrofuels and energy sovereignty, environmental services and rural education. Biodiversity and food sovereignty are the two axes of this agenda for cooperation that forms part of an international struggle to reconstruct our food systems.


12.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Biodiversity loss in Latin American coffee landscapes: review of the evidence on ants, birds, and trees
Philpott, Stacy M. ; Arendt, Wayne J. (coaut.) ; Armbrecht, Inge (coaut.) ; Bichier, Peter (coaut.) ; Diestch, Thomas V. (coaut.) ; Gordon, Caleb (coaut.) ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Reynoso Santos, Roberto (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ; Tejeda Cruz, César (coaut.) ; Williams Linera, Guadalupe (coaut.) ; Valenzuela González, Jorge Ernesto (coaut.) ; Zolotoff, José Manuel (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 22, no. 5 (October 2008), p. 1093-1105 ISSN: 0888-8892
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
46889-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en español

Diversos estudios han documentado las pérdidas de biodiversidad debido a la intensificación del manejo de café (disminución de la riqueza y complejidad del dosel). Sin embargo, persisten preguntas sobre la sensibilidad relativa de diferentes taxa, especialistas de hábitat y grupos funcionales, y sí las implicaciones para la conservación de la biodiversidad varían entre regiones. Revisamos cuantitativamente los datos de estudios de biodiversidad de hormigas, aves y árboles en agroecosistemas de café para abordar las siguientes preguntas: ¿La riqueza de especies declina con la intensificación o con las características individuales de la vegetación?¿Hay pérdidas significativas de riqueza de especies en los sistemas cafetaleros en comparación con los bosques?¿Es mayor la pérdida en especies de bosque o en grupos funcionales particulares? y ¿Las aves o las hormigas son más afectadas por la intensificación? En los estudios revisados, la riqueza de hormigas y aves declinó con la intensificación del manejo y con los cambios de vegetación. La riqueza de especies de todas las hormigas y aves y la de especies de hormigas y aves de bosque fue menor en la mayoría de los agroecosistemas cafetaleros que en los bosques, pero el café rústico (cultivado bajo dosel de bosque nativo) sustentó la mayor pérdida de especies, y la pérdida de especies de hormigas, aves y árboles de bosque aumentó con la intensificación del manejo.

Las pérdidas de especies de hormigas y aves fueron similares, aunque las pérdidas de hormigas de bosque fueron más drásticas en el café rústico. La riqueza de especies de aves migratorias y de aves que forrajean en varios estratos de vegetación fueron menos afectadas por la intensificación que las especies residentes de dosel y de sotobosque. Las fincas rústicas protegieron más especies que otros sistemas cafetaleros, y la pérdida de especies dependió mayormente de la especialización de hábitat y de los atributos funcionales. Recomendamos que el bosque sea protegido, se promueva el café rústico y se restauren las fincas intensivas mediante el incremento de la densidad y riqueza de árboles nativos y permitiendo el crecimiento de epífitas. También recomendamos que las futuras investigaciones enfoquen las compensaciones potenciales entre la conservación de la biodiversidad y la forma de vida de los campesinos que producen café.

Resumen en inglés

Studies have documented biodiversity losses due to intensification of coffee management (reduction in canopy richness and complexity). Nevertheless, questions remain regarding relative sensitivity of different taxa, habitat specialists, and functional groups, and whether implications for biodiversity conservation vary across regions.We quantitatively reviewed data from ant, bird, and tree biodiversity studies in coffee agroecosystems to address the following questions: Does species richness decline with intensification or with individual vegetation characteristics? Are there significant losses of species richness in coffee-management systems compared with forests? Is species loss greater for forest species or for particular functional groups?and Are ants or birds more strongly affected by intensification? Across studies, ant and bird richness declined with management intensification and with changes in vegetation. Species richness of all ants and birds and of forest ant and bird species was lower in most coffee agroecosystems than in forests, but rustic coffee (grown under native forest canopies) had equal or greater ant and bird richness than nearby forests.

Sun coffee(grown without canopy trees) sustained the highest species losses, and species loss of forest ant, bird, and tree species increased with management intensity. Losses of ant and bird species were similar, although losses of forest ants were more drastic in rustic coffee. Richness of migratory birds and of birds that forage across vegetation strata was less affected by intensification than richness of resident, canopy, and understory bird species. Rustic farms protected more species than other coffee systems, and loss of species depended greatly on habitat specialization and functional traits. We recommend that forest be protected, rustic coffee be promoted,and intensive coffee farms be restored by augmenting native tree density and richness and allowing growth of epiphytes. We also recommend that future research focus on potential trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and farmer livelihoods stemming from coffee production.


13.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Shaded coffee and the stability of rainforest margins in northern Latin America
Perfecto, Ivette (autora) ; Armbrecht, Inge (autora) ; Phillpott, Stacy M. (autora) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (autora) (1958-) ; Dietsch, Thomas V. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Stability of tropical rainforest margins: linking ecological, economic and social constraints of land use and conservation Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany : Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2007 páginas 227-263 ISBN:3-540-30289-1 :: 978-3-540-30289-6
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
37685-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Most native forests in Latin America are highly fragmented. In the mid elevation areas of Northern Latin America, the agricultural matrix is frequently composed of coffee. In this region, coffee has been traditionally cultivated under the diverse canopy of shade trees, representing a high quality matrix that can contribute to the social and ecological stability of the region. This agroforestry system has been proven to be important for biodiversity conservation. Studies over the last fifteen years have shown that shaded coffee plantations maintain a high diversity of vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. These organisms play an important role in the functioning of coffee agroecosystems. Shaded coffee plantations promote a high abundance and diversity of natural enemies that help to regulate herbivores, weeds and diseases. Shaded plantations also harbor a higher diversity of native pollinators which have been shown to contribute to higher coffee yields. Likewise, the diverse shade-tree component contributes to soil fertility and soil conservation and has been shown to contribute significantly to carbon sequestration.

As a matrix, coffee agroforests also contribute to the conservation of biodiversity withinforest fragments by promoting migration among fragments and facilitating a metapopulation structure. Three “sustainable” coffee certification programs have been developed to help farmers cope with the vagaries of the market: organic, fair-trade and biodiversity-friendly (or shade-grown). Although certified coffees still represent a small niche market, they have the potential to promote conservation and benefit the livelihoods of small producers. Especially under conditions of low international coffee prices, as those experienced in the first years of this century, these certification programs have contributed to the ecological and socio-economic stability of the coffee growing regions of northern Latin America.


14.
Libro
Stability of tropical rainforest margins: linking ecological, economic and social constraints of land use and conservation / Teja Tscharntke, Christoph Leuschner, Manfred Zeller, Edi Guhardja, Arifuddin Bidin, (eds.)
Disponible en línea: Stability of tropical rainforest margins: linking ecological, economic and social constraints of land use and conservation.
Tscharntke, Teja (editor) (1952-) ; Leuschner, Christoph (editor) ; Zeller, Manfred (editor) ; Guhardja, Edi (editor) ; Bidin, Arifuddin (editor) ;
Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany : Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg , c2007
Disponible en línea
Clasificación: 634.928 / S8
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010011083 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

15.
Libro
Arthropod diversity and conservation / edited by David L. Hawksworth and Alan T. Bull
Disponible en línea: Arthropod diversity and conservation.
Hawksworth, David L. (editor) ; Bull, Alan T. (editor) ;
Dordrecht, The Netherlands : Springer , c2006
Disponible en línea
Clasificación: 632.65 / A7
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010015069 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

16.
Tesis - Doctorado
Diversidad y estructura poblacional de arañas en un paisaje fragmentado en San Fernando Chiapas / Miguel Ángel Pinkus Rendón
Pinkus Rendón, Miguel Ángel ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (tutor) ; León Cortés, Jorge Leonel (asesor) ; Parra Tabla, Víctor (asesor) ; Perfecto, Ivette (asesora) ;
San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2006
Clasificación: TE/595.44097275 / P5
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040002586 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030001665 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010009099 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020008980 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050002760 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en español

La presente tesis tuvo como finalidad determinar el impacto de la fragmentación y el tipo de uso del suelo sobre las arañas en un paisaje heterogéneo del sureste de México, esto fue abordado desde tres enfoques a) con la comunidad entera de arañas, b) con las arañas más abundantes y c) con las poblaciones de una especie. La metodología utilizada (trampas pit fall y muestreo directo) en este trabajo incluyó a la comunidad de arañas para mostrar una perspectiva realista de cómo este grupo bioindicador responde a las diferentes variables de complejidad del hábitat. Asimismo, a una escala poblacional, se analizó la repercusión de la estructura de los microhábitats en un gradiente de perturbación empleando experimentos de marca-recaptura utilizados para otros organismos sensibles a cambios ambientales. Se determino que la comunidad de arañas responde a la complejidad y estructura de los hábitats observándose un gradiente de perturbación, agrupando las especies según la similitud entre 18 tipos de hábitats, desde hábitats estables hasta hábitats perturbados antropogénicamente. Aunado a lo anterior se identificaron especies clave dentro del paisaje que mantienen una correlación positiva o negativa (dependiendo la especie) al grado de perturbación de los hábitats, pudiendo ser utilizadas en un futuro como evaluadoras del impacto humano. Por último, el análisis poblacional de Frontinella tihialis indicó que está araña sedentaria posee una población distribuida en manchones, respondiendo a cambios en una escala pequeña (microhábitat), pudiendo soportar una gran parte de la población en una sola planta grande como Jaqunia sp. o en varias plantas pequeñas cercanas entre sí como Euphorhia sp.

Por el flujo que existe entre los microhábitats y la disponibilidad de los mismos dentro de los parches, la conservación de poblaciones de arañas en paisajes fragmentados está condicionada a la conexión entre parches del mismo hábitat o a parches de hábitats estructuralmente similares.

Índice

Dedicatoria
Agradecimientos
Resumen
Introducción
Spider diversity in a tropical habitat gradient in Chiapas, Mexico
Diversity Distrib. (2006) 12: 61-69
The distribution and abundance of a spider community in a humanized landscape of tropical Mexico
Spider population structure in relation to small-scale habitat variations in a fragmented landscape of southeast Mexico
Discusión general
Conclusiones
Referencias


17.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Seasonal shift in the foraging niche of a tropical avian resident: resource competition at work?
Jedlicka, Julie A. ; Greenberg, Russell (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Philpott, Stacy M. (coaut) ;
Contenido en: Journal of Tropical Ecology Vol. 22, no. 4 (July 2006 ), p. 419-429 ISSN: 0266-4674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B9155 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Este estudio examinó el comportamiento de forrajeo de un ave residente, Basileuterus rufifrons (RCWA), en una finca de café con sombra en Chiapas, México. A diferencia de muchas aves residentes que usan los agroecosistemas de café con sombra solamante durante una estación, RCWAs no se van a otros hábitats cuando los aves migrantes están presente. El forrajeo de RCWA fue comparado cuando las aves migrantes eran presente (la época seca) y ausente (la época de lluvia). La hipótesis fue que los RCWA exhibirían un cambio de forrajeo con los cambios de estaciones a causa de la competencia de recursos con los migrantes. Observaciones en el docel y el sotobosque en un cafetal muestran que durante la época de lluvia, los RCWAs forrajean igualmente en los dos niveles de vegetación, pero tienen más éxito forrajeando en el docel. Durante la época seca, los migrantes forrajean principalmente en el docel y los RCWAs se mueven al sotobosque donde efectúan 80% de las maniobras de forrajeo. Durante ese tiempo, los RCWAs tuvieron menos éxito forrajeando tanto en el docel como en el sotobosque. Durante la época seca el número de artrópodos bajó entre 47–79% en el docel y entre 4–5% en el sotobosque a causa de la depredación de las aves. En el docel, la disponibilidad de artrópodos grandes (>5 mm en longitud) bajó en un 58% de la época de lluvia a la época seca. Tales reducciones de recursos podrían causar el cambio de lugar a forrajeo observado en RCWA, pero otras explicaciones e hipótesis son discutidas. Pueden ser que este cambio de forrajeo sea común en algunas aves residentes pequeñas que comen artrópodos para evitar la competencia con los migrantes durante la época seca

Resumen en inglés

This study examined the foraging behaviour of a resident bird species, the rufous-capped warbler (RCWA, Basileuterus rufifrons), in a shaded-coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. Unlike many resident species that use shaded-coffee agroecosystems seasonally, RCWAs do not move to other habitats when migrants are present. RCWA foraging was compared when migrant birds were present (dry season) and absent (wet season). It was hypothesized that RCWAs would exhibit a seasonal foraging niche shift because of resource competition with migrants. Observations from both the canopy and coffee understorey show that RCWAs foraged almost equally in both vegetative layers during the wet season although they were more successful foraging in the canopy. In the dry season, migrants foraged primarily in the canopy and RCWAs shifted so that 80% of RCWA foraging manoeuvres were in the understorey. At that time RCWAs foraged less successfully in both vegetative layers. Avian predation in the dry season was found to reduce densities of arthropods by 47-79% in the canopy, as opposed to 4-5% in the understorey. In the canopy, availability of large (>5 mm in length) arthropods decreased by 58% from the wet to dry season. Such resource reductions could have caused the RCWA foraging niche shift yet other alternative or additional hypotheses are discussed. Shifts in foraging niche may be a widespread mechanism for some small insectivorous residents to avoid seasonal competition with abundant migrant species.


18.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Aboveground biomass accumulation in a tropical wet forest in Nicaragua following a catastrophic hurricane disturbance
Mascaro, Joseph ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ; Barros, Oton (coaut.) ; Boucher, Douglas H. (coaut.) ; Granzow de la Cerda, Iñigo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biotropica Vol. 37, no. 4 (December 2005), p. 600-608 ISSN: 0006-3606
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B8693 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
PDF

19.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Biodiversity, yield, and shade coffee certification
Perfecto, Ivette ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; Mas, Alex (coaut.) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (coaut.) (1958-) ;
Clasificación: AR/633.73072 / B5
Contenido en: Ecological Economics No. 54 (2005), p. 435-446
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010009096 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020008371 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The current crisis in the coffee market provides an opportunity to explore alternative markets. In Latin America, coffee is traditionally produced under a diverse and dense canopy of shade trees. The structural and floristic diversity contained therein harbors a high biodiversity of associated organisms. The recent trend of reducing this shade cover so as to increase production raises concerns about the potential loss of biodiversity. This concern has given rise to a variety of conservation programs, including shade coffee certification, a market-based conservation strategy. Shade coffee certification programs offer the opportunity to link environmental and economic goals. Although the idea of shade certification is to compensate farmers for the biodiversity conservation service provided by their shaded plantations, the premium offered may not compensate for the low yields of the most shaded plantations. Here we present an approach for guiding the establishment of premium prices for coffee producers based on scientific information that relates shade percentage and levels of species richness with yield. Partial data from two separate studies in Chiapas, Mexico, are combined and used to illustrate this approach. In addition, further theoretical explorations are made by adapting an intercropping model and using coffee yield and biodiversity (as it relates to percent of shade of canopy trees) as the two relevant variables. This model is examined qualitatively from the point of view of optimality (balancing biodiversity preservation with production). Results suggest that price premium for shade certification should be high and go directly to the producers, especially if the intent is to conserve forest-sensitive species.


20.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Reducción en la diversidad y complejiad del ensamble de hormigas de la hojarasca en plantaciones de café colombianas = Reduced diversity and complexity in the leaf-litter ant assemblage of colombian coffee plantations
Armbrecht, Inge ; Rivera, Leonardo (coaut.) ; Perfecto, Ivette (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Conservation Biology Vol. 19, no. 3 (june 2005), p. 897-907 ISSN: 1987-2001
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B5486 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal

21.
Tesis - Licenciatura
Estructura, composición florística y diversidad del bosque y cafetales de la Reserva de la Biosfera el Triunfo, Chiapas, México / Roberto Reynoso Santos
Reynoso Santos, Roberto ; Pérez Farrera, Miguel Ángel (director) ; Soto Pinto, Lorena (asesora) (1958-) ; Perfecto, Ivette (asesora) ;
Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, México : Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, Escuela de Biología , 2004
Clasificación: TE/634.99097275 / R4
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010006333 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

22.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Greater predation in shaded coffee farms: the role of resident neotropical birds
Perfecto, Ivette ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ; López Bautista, Gustavo (coaut.) ; Ibarra Núñez, Guillermo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Ecology Vol. 85, no. 10 (October 2004), p. 2677-2681 ISSN: 0012-9658
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
B3395 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

It is commonly thought that diverse agroecosystems are less prone to pest outbreaks because they support a high diversity of natural enemies. The idea that diversity stabilizes functional properties of communities to environmental perturbation is formalized in the ecological literature as the "insurance hypothesis." Recently this hypothesis has been examined theoretically and in microcosm experiments. However it has not been tested empirically in an agroecosystem. Here we provide a test of the insurance hypothesis by examining insect predation by birds in coffee farms with different levels of plant diversity. Lepidopteran larvae were placed in coffee plants, and larval disappearance rates were measured within and outside bird exclosures in two farms with distinct levels of shade. Significant differences were found associated with the exclosure treatment, indicating that birds can potentially prevent pest outbreaks. Furthermore, the effect was significant only for the farm with a high floristic diversity, providing partial evidence in support of the insurance hypothesis.


23.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Conservation of biodiversity in coffee agroecosystems: a tri-taxa comparison in southern Mexico
Perfecto, Ivette ; Mas, Alexandre (coaut.) ; Dietsch, Thomas (coaut.) ; Vandermeer, John (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and Conservation Vol. 12, no. 6 (June 2003), p. 1239-1252 ISSN: 0960-3115
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
B9657 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

We compare species richness of birds, fruit-feeding butterflies and ground-foraging ants along a coffee intensification gradient represented by a reduction in the number of species of shade trees and percentage of shade cover in coffee plantations. We sampled the three taxa in the same plots within the same period of time. Two sites were selected in the Soconusco region of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. Within each site four habitat types were selected and within each habitat type four points were randomly selected. The habitat types were forest, rustic coffee, diverse shade coffee, and intensive coffee (low density of shade). We found different responses of the three taxa along the intensification gradient. While ants and butterflies generally decrease in species richness with the decrease of shade cover, birds declined in one site but increased in the other. Ant species richness appears to be more resistant to habitat modification, while butterfly species richness appears to be more sensitive.

Bird species richness was correlated with distance from forest fragments but not with habitat type, suggesting that scale and landscape structure may be important for more mobile taxa. For each of these taxa, the rustic plantation was the one that maintained species richness most similar to the forest. We found no correlation between the three taxa, suggesting that none of these taxa are good candidates as surrogates for each other. We discuss the implications of these results for the conservation of biodiversity in coffee plantations, in particular, the importance of distinguishing between different levels of shade, and the possibility that different taxa might be responding to habitat changes at different spatial scales.


24.
Libro
Tropical agroecosystems / edited by John H. Vandermeer
Vandermeer, John (editor) ;
Boca Raton, Florida, United States : CRC Press , c2003
Clasificación: 630.2745 / T7
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020007235 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice

Introduction
Plant-Plant interactions in tropical agriculture
Pest management in mesoamerican agroecosystems
Managing Mycorrhizae for sustainable agriculture in the tropics
Technological change and biodiversity in the rubber agroecosystem of sumatra
Technological change and biodiversity in the coffee Agroecosystem of Northern Latin America
Tropical agricultural landscapes
Wildlife in the context of tropical Agroecosystems
Tropical agriculture and human disease: Ecological complexities pose research challenges


25.
Libro
Actas del simposio café y biodiversidad / editores: Alex Monro y María Carmen Peña Chocarro
Congreso de la Sociedad Mesoamericana para la Biología y la Conservación (5 : 2001 : San Salvador) ; Monro, Alex (ed.) ; Peña Chocarro, María Carmen (coed.) ;
San Salvador, El Salvador : The Natural History Museum :: Universidad de El Salvador , 2002
Clasificación: F/633.730972 / C6
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020007883 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1