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25 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Royse, Daniel J.
11.
Artículo
Scytalidium thermophilum-colonized grain, corncobs and chopped wheat straw substrates for the production of Agaricus bisporus
Sánchez, José E. ; Royse, Daniel J. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Bioresource Technology Vol. 100, no. 4 (February 2009), p. 1670-1674
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
37021-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

We examined the possibility of cultivating Agaricus bisporus (Ab) on various grains and agricultural byproducts, with the objective of improving yield capacity of substrate pre-colonized by Scytalidium thermophilum (St). Radial growth rate (RGR) of St at 45 C ranged from no growth on sterile wheat grain to 14.9 mm/d on whole oats. The linear extension rate (LER) of Ab, grown on St-colonized substrate (4 days at 45 C), ranged from a low of 2.7 mm/d on 100% corncobs to 4.7 mm/d on a 50/50 mixture of ground corncobs/millet grain. Several other substrates containing wheat straw + ground corncobs + boiled millet and pre-colonized by St (4 days at 42 ± 3 C), were evaluated for production of Ab. The biological efficiency (BE) of production increased linearly with the addition of millet to the formula. However, substrates with millet levels P84% often were contaminated before mushroom harvest. Maximum BE (99%) and yield (21.6 kg/m2) were obtained on St-colonized wheat straw + 2% hydrated lime supplemented with 9% commercial supplement added both at spawning and at casing.


12.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Pangola grass colonized with Scytalidium thermophilum for production of Agaricus bisporus
Sánchez, José E. ; Mejía Vega, Laura Virginia (coaut.) ; Royse, Daniel J. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Bioresource Technology Vol. 99, no. 3 (February 2008), p. 655-662 ISSN: 0960-8524
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This work had the dual objective of selecting a substrate for rapid mycelial growth of Scytalidium thermophilum and then comparing the growth and production of a brown variety of Agaricus bisporus on substrate non-colonized and colonized with S. thermophilum. Mycelial growth of S. thermophilum at 45 °C was significantly greater on potato dextrose yeast extract agar (0.58 mm/h) as compared to malt extract glucose agar (0.24 mm/h) and yeast extract glucose agar (0.44 mm/h). On cereal grain, S. thermophilum grew significantly faster on rice (0.31 mm/h) compared to sorghum (0.22 mm/h) and millet (0.18 mm/h). It also grew faster on Pangola grass (0.49 mm/h) compared to corncobs (0.30 mm/h) and sawdust (0.18 mm/h). Colonization of Pangola grass with S. thermophilum was influenced by the addition of calcium salts in the form of gypsum, hydrated lime and ground limestone. For production of A. bisporus, biological efficiency (BE) on pasteurized Pangola grass pre-colonized by S. thermophilum for 4 days at 45 °C was more than twice (26.4%) that on grass non-colonized by S. thermophilum (11.0%). The addition of 2% hydrated lime to Pangola grass prior to colonization by S. thermophilum resulted in an additional doubling of BE of mushroom production (48.1%). These results show the possibility of developing a non-composted substrate method for producing A. bisporus without autoclaving the substrate.


13.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Re supplementing and re-casing mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) compost for a second crop
Royse, Daniel J. ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ; Beelman, Robert B. (coaut.) ; Davidson, James (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology Vol. 24, no. 3 (2008), p. 319-325 ISSN: 0959-3993
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
1369-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Experiments were performed to determine the effect of adding nutrient supplements to colonized mushroom compost (MC) for the production of a second crop of mushrooms. Mushrooms were harvested for 1, 2 or 3 flushes, the casing removed and the MC then was fragmented and re-supplemented with delayed release supplements treated or non-treated with fungicide (thiophanate-methyl; Topsin M 70WP) and re-cased. Overall double-crop yields were higher when MC was re-supplemented after 1st flush (1st flush MC) as compared to re-supplementation after the 2nd or 3rd flushes. Mean double-crop BEs were 128, 119 and 109% when 1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-flush MCs were used, respectively. Treatment of delayed release supplement with thiophanate-methyl fungicide did not affect mushroom yields. Soluble salts and potassium concentrations increased 350 and 900%, respectively, in the casing overlay through three flushes suggesting that removal of the casing would help to alleviate the build up of these potential growth-limiting materials. Re-supplementing and re-casing of MC represents a potential opportunity for growers to increase revenues and reduce costs associated with preparation and disposal of compost. The ability to double-crop mushroom compost would provide growers a chance to increase yields by 40% or more, depending on whether they re-supplement and re-case after 1st, 2nd or 3rd flush.


14.
Artículo
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Supplementation of 2nd break mushroom compost with isoleucine, leucine, valine, phenylalanine, Fermenten and SoyPlus
Royse, Daniel J. ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology Vol. 24, no. 10 (2008), p. 2011-2017 ISSN: 0959-3993
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
43105-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Three mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) crops (Crops 1, 2, 3) were grown to evaluate the effects of re-supplementing “spent” mushroom compost (MC) with the crystalline amino acids isoleucine (ile), leucine (leu), valine (val) and phenylalanine (phe) singly or in combination with Fermenten® or SoyPlus® on mushroom yield. Fermenten® is a rumen fermentation enhancer while SoyPlus® is a commercial delayed release mushroom nutrient. The most important single amino acid found for stimulating mushroom yield from 2nd break MC was ile. Crystalline ile added to 2nd break MC at 3.6% (dry wt) increased mushroom yields by 28.3% and 68.7% (average 48.5%) in Crops 1 and 2, respectively, compared to the non-supplemented control. In Crop 3, the addition of 5% or 10% ile to Fermenten® and SoyPlus® (3.6% total combined dry wt) did not significantly improve mushroom yield over treatments containing Fermenten® or SoyPlus® (3.6% total dry wt) alone. However, mixtures of equal quantities of Fermenten®, ile and val significantly increased yield over Fermenten® alone. Use of ile and val as supplements to stimulate mushroom yield from 2nd break MC is not economically viable because these amino acids are not commercially available at feed grade prices


15.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Supplementation of first break mushroom compost with hydrolyzed protein, commercial supplements and crystalline amino acids
Royse, Daniel J. ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology Vol. 24, no. 8 (agosto 2008), p. 1333-1339 ISSN: 0959-3993
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
1371-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-Tapachula
Resumen en español

Three mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) crops (Crops 1, 2, 3) were grown to evaluate the effects of re-supplementing “spent” first break compost [mushroom compost (MC)] on mushroom yield. Mushrooms were produced for one break at the Mushroom Test Demonstration Facility, the casing layer was removed and the MC was re-supplemented with hydrolyzed protein, commercial supplements and crystalline amino acids and then re-cased at the Mushroom Research Center. Sixteen supplements, including five crystalline amino acids, one amino acid blend, one egg white and four hydrolyzed proteins, Micromax® (a micronutrient containing nine minerals) and four commercial supplements were evaluated for their effect on mushroom yield and biological efficiency. In Crop 1, mushroom yields were stimulated (49–61%) when MC was re-supplemented with 3.6% (dry wt) Pro-Fam® H200 FG hydrolyzed soy protein, Remo’s commercial supplement, l-isoleucine (ile), egg white protein, amino blend HLA-198 and hydrolyzed whey. Significant yield reductions were observed for MC re-supplemented with 3.6% l-tyrosine, dl-methionine or l-arginine compared to the non-supplemented control.

In Crop 2, mushroom yield ranged from a high of 31.3 kg/m2 on MC supplemented with 3.3% Remo’s + 0.3% ile (oven dry MC) to a low of 22.6 kg/m2 on non-supplemented (control) MC (38.5% difference). In Crop 3, a response surface model was used in an attempt to optimize combinations of Remo’s commercial supplement, ile and Micromax.. The response surface solution for optimal yield was 2.9% Remo’s, 0.16% ile and 0.4% Micromax. Because many of the products tested performed equally well but varied substantially in their amino acid profiles, A. bisporus appears adaptable to different supplements containing both balanced and unbalanced amino acid contents, especially those rich in the branched chain amino acids. Development and improvement of supplements designed specifically for MC may allow further increases in productivity. Double cropping would ultimately lower the cost of mushroom production by reducing labor, raw materials and time required to prepare fresh Phase II compost.


16.
- Libro con arbitraje
Cultivo, mercadotecnia e inocuidad alimenticia de Agaricus bisporus / José E. Sánchez Vázquez, Daniel J. Royse, Hermilo Leal Lara, editores
Sánchez, José E. (ed.) ; Royse, Daniel J. (coed.) ; Leal Lara, Hermilo (coed.) ;
Tapachula, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2007
Clasificación: EE/635.80972 / C85
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040003248 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030004662 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010010992 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020011956 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050003251 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en español

Este libro presenta la información más actualizada sobre el cultivo del champiñón, el hongo más cultivado y conocido en el mundo. Se ofrecen avances en investigaciones que buscan métodos alternativos de producción, así como aspectos importantes para el éxito de toda empresa champiñonera. El libro fue escrito por especialistas reconocidos internacionalmente y es un aporte a la diseminación del conocimiento sobre este hongo hacia personas interesadas en los países hispanoparlantes.


17.
Artículo
Ground wheat straw as a substitute for portions of oak wood chips used in shiitake (Lentinula edodes) substrate formulae
Royse, Daniel J. ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Bioresource Technology Vol. 98, no. 11 (August 2007), p. 2137–2141 ISSN: 0960-8524
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Oak woodchips, used for production of shiitake Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, are increasingly difficult to obtain due to dwindling supplies. We investigated the effect of adding ground wheat straw as a substitute for portions of oak woodchips in substrate formulae on mushroom yield and size. We also determined the effect of mushroom cropping on relative feed value (RFV) by chemical analysis of the substrate at spawning (AS) and after cropping (AC). Three formulae containing 0%, 8% and 16% ground wheat straw and 52%, 44% and 36% oak sawdust, respectively, were bulk pasteurized (111 °C for 20 min) in an autoclaving mixer, subjected to spawn run (21 d), browning (28 d) and a production cycle of three breaks (38 d). Mean (4 crops) mushroom yields were 11% higher when 8% wheat straw was used in the medium and 19% higher when 16% wheat straw was substituted for portions of oak sawdust. There were no significant differences in mushroom sizes between any of the treatments. Relative feed values of shiitake substrates AC increased more dramatically as more wheat straw was added to the formulae. Using mature alfalfa (full bloom) as a base value of 100%, RFVs for substrate AS were 98%, 92%, and 92% for 0%, 8% and 16% straw, respectively; RFVs AC were 118%, 120% and 133%, respectively. Substrate AC containing 16% straw had a RFV comparable to corn silage (well-eared). Fat contents of the substrates decreased by 50–62% AC, whereas potassium contents decreased by 40%. Use of ground wheat straw in synthetic medium would not only increase mushroom yield by up to 19%, but may help alleviate periodic shortages of oak sawdust. In addition, growers would avoid the added expense of aging the wheat straw (for 8–12 week) as is typically done for oak sawdust in the industry. This is the first report of RFVs for spent shiitake substrate (SSS) predicting its excellent potential for use as animal feed.


18.
Capítulo de libro - Memoria en extenso
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Vermicompost in Substrate and Casing Formulas for the Production of Brown Agaricus bisporus
García, B. S. ; Royse, Daniel Joseph (autor) ; Sánchez, José E. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Mushroom Biology and Mushroom Products: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Mushroom Biology and Mushroom Products, 8-12 April 2005, Shanghai, China / edited by Qi Tan, Jingsong Zhang, ...[et al.] Shangai, China : Agricultural Information Institute of Science and Technology, c2005 Volumen 12, páginas 243-248 ISSN: 1005-9873
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
53451-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
53451-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a

19.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Yield, mushroom size and time to production of pleurotus cornucopiae (oyster mushroom) grown on switch grass substrate spawned and supplemented at various rates
Royse, Daniel J. ; Rhodes, T. W. (coaut.) ; Ohga, S. (coaut.) ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Bioresource Technology Vol. 91, no. 1 (January 2004), p. 85-91 ISSN: 0960-8524
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

To find a cost effective alternative substrate, Pleurotus cornucopiae 608 (yellow basidiomata) was grown on: (1) chopped, pasteurized switch grass (Panicum virgatum, 99%) with 1% ground limestone and (2) a mixture of pasteurized cottonseed hulls (75% dry wt.), 24% chopped wheat straw, and 1% ground limestone (all ingredients wt./wt.). The substrates were spawned at various levels (2.5%, 3.75% or 5% wet wt., crop I) and non-supplemented or supplemented with commercial delayed release nutrient (Campbell’s S-41) at various levels (0%, 1.5%, 3%, 4.5%, 6%, 7.5% and 9% dry wt., crop II). Maximum yield (weight of fresh mushrooms harvested at maturity) was obtained on cottonseed hull/wheat straw substrate at a 3.75–5% spawn level and 6% S-41 supplement. On switch grass substrate, increasing spawn levels and supplement levels stimulated yields in a linear fashion. However, maximum yields were only 46% or less for those of similar treatments on cottonseed hull/wheat straw substrate. Yields were three times higher on switch grass that was harvested after the grass had senesced (winter; beige color) compared to material that was harvested when the grass was green (summer; time of flowering). Additional physical processing of the material, such as milling, may improve yield potential of this material.


20.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Influence of precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3) on shiitake (Lentinula edodes) yield and mushroom size
Royse, Daniel J. ; Sánchez, José E. (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/589.2 / R68
Contenido en: Bioresource Technology Vol. 90, no. 2 (April 2003), p. 225-228 ISSN: 0960-8524
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020007845 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Synthetic substrate consisting of oak sawdust (50%), white millet (28%), winter rye (11%) and soft red wheat bran (11%) was non-supplemented or supplemented with 0.2%, 0.4% or 0.6% (dry weight basis) precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) was grown in two crops to determine the effect of three CaCO3 levels on mushroom yield and size. Yields and biological efficiencies (averages for two crops) from substrates non-supplemented with CaCO3 were lower by 14.1%, 18.4% and 24.9% compared to treatments supplemented with 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% CaCO3, respectively. Mushroom size (weight) was larger with non-supplemented substrate (16.8 g) compared to substrate supplemented with 0.6% CaCO3 (15.1 g). However, mushroom production was more consistent from crop to crop when 0.6% CaCO3 was added to substrate.