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8 resultados encontrados para: AUTOR: Serio Silva, Juan Carlos
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1.
- Libro con arbitraje
Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatán Peninsula / editores: Gerald Alexander Islebe, Sophie Calmé, Jorge L. León-Cortés, Birgit Schmook
Disponible en línea: Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatán Peninsula.
Islebe, Gerald A. (ed.) ; Calmé, Sophie (coed.) ; León Cortés, Jorge Leonel (coed.) ; Schmook, Birgit Inge (coed.) ;
New York, New York, United States : Springer International Publishing , c2015
Clasificación: EE/333.951609726 / B5
Bibliotecas: Chetumal , Villahermosa
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030008466 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050006345 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This book provides information relevant for the conservation of biodiversity and the sound management of the coastal and forest ecosystems of the Yucatan Peninsula in the face of global change. Various aspects of the biodiversity of the Yucatan Peninsula are analyzed in an integrative manner, including phenological, ecophysiological, ecological and conservation aspects of plants and animals and their relationships with humans in coastal and forest ecosystems.

Índice

1. Introduction: biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatán peninsula, Mexico
Chapter 1. Physical setting and vegetation
2. Physical settings, environmental history with an outlook on global change
3. Distribution of vegetation types
Chapter 2. Plants and environment
4. Vegetative and reproductive plant phenology
5. Physiological ecology of vascular plants
6. Bee–plant interactions: competition and phenology of flowers visited by bees
7. Natural and human induced disturbance in vegetation
8. Conservation and use
Chapter 3. Fauna
9. Diversity and eco-geographical distribution of insects
10. Large terrestrial mammals
11. Amphibians and reptiles
12. Birds
13. Subsistence hunting and conservation
Chapter 4. Ecosystems and conservation
14. Transverse coastal corridor: from freshwater lakes to coral reefs ecosystems
15. Forest ecosystems and conservation
Index


2.
Tesis - Maestría
Cortisol y endoparásitos de mono araña (Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis) bajo diferente grado de presencia humana / Natalia Deveaux Durán
Deveaux Durán, Natalia (autora) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (director) ; González Solís, David (asesor) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (asesor) ; García Feria, Luis Manuel (asesor) ;
Lerma, Campeche, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2014
Disponible en línea
Clasificación: TE/599.82097264 / D4
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040005310 (Disponible) , 53439 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Cerrar
SIBE Chetumal
ECO030008059 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010000592 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013178 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Villahermosa
ECO050005573 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
PDF
Índice

Capítulo I. Introducción
Marco teórico
Objetivo general
Objetivos específicos
Hipótesis
Capítulo II. Gastrointestinal parasites and fecal cortisol of spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis) in locations with different level of human Presence
Abstract
Introduction
Methods
Results
Discussion
Acknowledgments
References
Capítulo III. Conclusiones
Aspectos éticos
Literatura citada
Anexo


3.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
Large terrestrial mammals
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel ; O´Farril Cruz, Elsa Georgina (coaut.) ; Chávez Tovar, Cuauhtémoc (coaut.) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (coaut.) ; Castillo Vela, Guillermo Edgardo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Biodiversity and conservation of the Yucatan Peninsula New York : Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015 p. 227-255 ISBN:978-3-319-06528-1
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SAA008098 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The Yucatan Peninsula contains some of the largest tracts of tropical forest in Mexico. These forests host six species of ungulates, including the largest and last survivor of the Neotropical megafauna, the Central American Tapir; one of the rarest ungulate species in Mexico, the White-lipped Peccary; and one endemic species of deer, the Gray Brocket. The Yucatan Peninsula is also home to another peccary species, two more deer species, five felid species, including the jaguar and the puma, and three species of primates. Most of these species face serious conservation threats, as their habitat is increasingly fragmented and because they are among the preferred targets of subsistence hunters. Some of these species require large areas of habitat in good conservation status to fulfill their basic needs for survival. Several research projects undertaken in the past years, and some currently being carried out, have addressed a lack of basic ecological information in this region. Among the ungulates, ecological research has focused on tapir, white-lipped peccary and the three deer species. For felids, scientific attention has been focused on the two largest species, the jaguar and puma; and all three primate species have received scientific attention recently, although more studies have focused on the black howler monkey. This chapter is an attempt to summarize what is currently known about these, the largest mammal species of the Yucatan Peninsula, and to point out gaps in the existing information. Such information is absolutely necessary to design conservation and management plans for these highly interesting and endangered species.


4.
Libro
New perspectives in the study of Mesoamerican primates: distribution, ecology, behavior, and conservation / edited by Alejandro Estrada, Paul A. Garber, Mary McDonald Pavelka, LeAndra Luecke
Estrada Medina, Jesús Alejandro (editor) ; Garber, Paul Alan (editor) ; McDonald Pavelka, Mary (editora) ; Luecke, LeAndra (editora) ;
New York, New York, United States : Springer Science+Business Media , c2006
Clasificación: AC/599.809728 / N4
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010013630 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

5.
Libro
Perspectivas en primatología mexicana / Lilia Ma. Gama Campillo, Gilberto Pozo Montuy, Wilfrido M. Contreras Sánchez, Stefan L. Arriaga Weiss, editores
Gama Campillo, Lilia María (ed.) ; Pozo Montuy, Gilberto (coed.) ; Contreras Sánchez, Wilfrido Miguel (coed.) ;
Villahermosa, Tabasco, México : Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco , 2011
Clasificación: T/333.95 / C65/16
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040004625 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

6.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Primates adjust movement strategies due to changing food availability
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Teichroeb, Julie A. (autora) ; Bonnell, Tyler R. (autor) ; Hernández Sarabia, Raúl Uriel (autor) ; Vickers, Sofia M. (autora) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (autor) ; Sicotte, Pascale (autora) ; Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Behavioral Ecology Behavioral Ecology Vol. 29, no. 2 (March-April 2018), p. 368–376 ISSN: 1465-7279
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Animals are hypothesized to search their environments in predictable ways depending on the distribution of resources. Evenly distributed foods are thought to be best exploited with random Brownian movements; while foods that are patchy or unevenly distributed require non-Brownian strategies, such as Lévy walks. Thus, when food distribution changes due to seasonal variation, animals should show concomitant changes in their search strategies. We examined this issue in 6 monkey species from Africa and Mexico: 3 frugivores and 3 folivores. We hypothesized that the more patchily distributed fruit would result in frugivores showing more levy-like patterns of motion, while folivores, with their more homogenous food supply, would show Brownian patterns of motion. At least 3 and up to 5 of 6 species conformed to the overall movement pattern predicted by their primary dietary item. For folivorous black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), ursine colobus (Colobus vellerosus), and red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus), Brownian movement was supported or could not be ruled-out. Two frugivores (spider monkeys, Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis, and gray-cheeked mangabeys, Lophocebus albigena) showed Lévy walks, as predicted, but frugivorous vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) showed a Brownian walk. Additionally, we test whether seasonal variation in the spatial availability of food support environmentally driven changes in movement patterns. Four of 5 species tested for seasonal variation showed adjustments in their search strategies between the rainy and dry seasons. This study provides support for the notion that food distribution determines search strategies and that animal movement patterns are flexible, mirroring changes in the environment.


7.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje

8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Safeguarding biodiversity: what is perceived as working, according to the conservation community?
Chapman, Colin A. (coaut.) ; DeLuycker, Anneke (coaut.) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (coaut.) ; Serio Silva, Juan Carlos (coaut.) ; Smith, Thomas B. (coaut.) ; Strier, Karen B. (coaut.) ; Goldberg, Tony L. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Oryx. The International Journal of Conservation Vol. 50, no. 2 (April 2016), p. 302–307 ISSN: 1365-3008
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Dramatic increases in human populations and per capita consumption, climate change, overexploitation of marine and freshwater resources, and deforestation have caused a litany of negative consequences for biodiversity. Such doom-and-gloom scenarios are widely known, frequently cited and frankly depressing. Although accurate assessments of threats have clear value for intervention planning, we believe there is also a need to reflect on successes. Such reflection provides balance to negative scenarios and may shift attention towards constructive, positive action. Here we use a systematic evaluation of 90 success stories provided by conservation scientists and practitioners to explore the characteristics of the projects perceived as being associated with success. Success was deemed to have occurred for 19.4% of the projects simply because an event had occurred (e.g. a law was passed) and for 36.1% of projects quantitative data indicated success (e.g. censuses demonstrated population increase). However, for most projects (63.9%) there was no evaluation and success was defined by the subjective opinion of the respondent. Conservation community members viewed successful projects most often as those being long-term (88%), small in spatial scale (52%), with a relatively low budget (68%), and involving a protectionist approach alone or in combination with another approach. These results highlight the subjectivity of definitions of success in conservation but also the characteristics of conservation efforts that the conservation community perceives as indicative of success.