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617 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Bosques tropicales
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1.
Libro
Ecology of epiphytes and epiphyte communities in montane rain forests, Colombia / Jan Hendrik Diederik Wolf
Wolf, Jan Hendrik Diederik ;
[The Netherlands] : [University of Amsterdam, Department of Systematics, Evolution and Palaeobiology] , s.f.
Clasificación: 584.09861 / W6
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
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SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010008265 (Disponible)
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2.
Libro
Programa de acción forestal tropical PROAFT
México. Secretaría de Agricultura y Recursos Hidráulicos. Subsecretaría Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre ;
México : Secretaría de Agricultura y Recursos Hidráulicos , s. f
Clasificación: F/634.928 / M4
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
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SIBE San Cristóbal
SAF001677 (Disponible)
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3.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Management strategies, silvopastoral practices and socioecological drivers in traditional livestock systems in tropical dry forests: an integrated analysis
Sánchez Romero, Rosa (autora) ; Balvanera, Patricia (autora) ; Castillo Álvarez, Alicia (autora) ; Mora Ardila, Francisco (autor) ; García Barrios, Luis Enrique (autor) ; González Esquivel, Carlos Ernesto (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Forest Ecology and Management Volumen 479, artículo número 118506 (January 2021), páginas 1-10 ISSN: 0378-1127
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Understanding traditional livestock management is essential in the design of more sustainable systems, given the forest loss associated to the growing demand for meat. In Latin America, where extensive livestock production is increasing, along with tropical dry forest (TDF) transformation, the role of small holders is critical for designing more sustainable management practices. This study is an integrated socioecological analysis of traditional livestock systems in a region with TDF in Mexico. The objectives were to: a) characterise the historical development and current state of livestock systems and silvopastoral practices, b) define the management strategies and their impacts on forests, and c) identify the regional and local socioecological drivers that influence decision- making processes in livestock and forest management. In-depth interviews were carried out to 32 cattle farmers and analysed using a qualitative-interpretative approach which included multivariate and narrative analyses. Three historical stages (colonization, promotion of livestock and forest conservation) had a strong impact in the development and current state of livestock systems. Access to natural and economic resources and proportion of plant cover (grassland/forest) were essential in defining four groups of management strategies.

The main regional drivers favouring or restricting production include climate, native vegetation, markets and public policies; at the local scale, socioecological factors, such as water availability, native vegetation, economic assets, local knowledge and their interactions determine heterogeneity in management strategies, decision-making processes and their impacts on forests. Adaptive management of livestock and forests in a context of limited economic resources has allowed the conservation of forest areas and the use of silvopastoral practices with local tree species. The integrated socio-ecological approach and the use of mixed methods allowed a better understanding of drivers and their interrelationships, the local knowledge, objectives and perceptions of farmers in the decision-making processes regarding livestock and forest management. Perspectives of farmers on resource use can contribute to the design of more effective and inclusive policies for sustainable livestock systems in the dry tropics.


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Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

Here, we use 30 long-term, high-resolution palaeoecological records from Mexico, Central and South America to address two hypotheses regarding possible drivers of resilience in tropical forests as measured in terms of recovery rates from previous disturbances. First, we hypothesize that faster recovery rates are associated with regions of higher biodiversity, as suggested by the insurance hypothesis. And second, that resilience is due to intrinsic abiotic factors that are location specific, thus regions presently displaying resilience in terms of persistence to current climatic disturbances should also show higher recovery rates in the past. To test these hypotheses, we applied a threshold approach to identify past disturbances to forests within each sequence. We then compared the recovery rates to these events with pollen richness before the event. We also compared recovery rates of each site with a measure of present resilience in the region as demonstrated by measuring global vegetation persistence to climatic perturbations using satellite imagery. Preliminary results indeed show a positive relationship between pre-disturbance taxonomic richness and faster recovery rates. However, there is less evidence to support the concept that resilience is intrinsic to a region; patterns of resilience apparent in ecosystems presently are not necessarily conservative through time.


5.
Artículo
PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Background: Reliable information about the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) in tropical forests is fundamental for climate change mitigation and for maintaining carbon stocks. Recent AGB maps at continental and national scales have shown large uncertainties, particularly in tropical areas with high AGB values. Errors in AGB maps are linked to the quality of plot data used to calibrate remote sensing products, and the ability of radar data to map high AGB forest. Here we suggest an approach to improve the accuracy of AGB maps and test this approach with a case study of the tropical forests of the Yucatan peninsula, where the accuracy of AGB mapping is lower than other forest types in Mexico. To reduce the errors in field data, National Forest Inventory (NFI) plots were corrected to consider small trees. Temporal differences between NFI plots and imagery acquisition were addressed by considering biomass changes over time. To overcome issues related to saturation of radar backscatter, we incorporate radar texture metrics and climate data to improve the accuracy of AGB maps. Finally, we increased the number of sampling plots using biomass estimates derived from LiDAR data to assess if increasing sample size could improve the accuracy of AGB estimates.

Results: Correcting NFI plot data for both small trees and temporal differences between field and remotely sensed measurements reduced the relative error of biomass estimates by 12.2%. Using a machine learning algorithm, Random Forest, with corrected field plot data, backscatter and surface texture from the L‑band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) installed on the on the Advanced Land Observing Satellite‑1 (ALOS), and climatic water deficit data improved the accuracy of the maps obtained in this study as compared to previous studies (R²=0.44 vs R²= 0.32). However, using sample plots derived from LiDAR data to increase sample size did not improve accuracy of AGB maps (R²= 0.26). Conclusions: This study reveals that the suggested approach has the potential to improve AGB maps of tropical dry forests and shows predictors of AGB that should be considered in future studies. Our results highlight the importance of using ecological knowledge to correct errors associated with both the plot‑level biomass estimates and the mis‑match between field and remotely sensed data.


6.
Artículo
Mapping disturbance from selective logging in tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Hernández Gómez, Irving Uriel (autor) ; Vázquez Luna, Dinora (autora) ; Cerdán Cabrera, Carlos Roberto (autor) ; Navarro Martínez, María Angélica (autora) ; Ellis, Edward Alan (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems Volumen 23, número 1 (2020), páginas 143-152 ISSN: 1870-0462
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

El mapeo de los impactos de la tala selectiva en la Península de Yucatán es importante para lograr la reducción de las emisiones de carbono y los objetivos de conservación de la biodiversidad. Objetivo. Evaluar la efectividad de la aplicación de técnicas de teledetección mediante el uso de imágenes LANDSAT 8 OLI para detectar la perturbación del bosque tropical a partir de la extracción de madera en cuatro bosques con manejo comunitario (ejidos). Además, evaluamos las diferencias entre ellos en términos de implementación de manejo forestal mejorado (IFM) y prácticas de aprovechamiento de impacto reducido (RIL). Metodología. Se calcularon los índices de vegetación y se realizó la clasificación de la cubierta forestal para hacer un mapa de las zonas taladas y no taladas y las perturbaciones específicas del aprovechamiento (por ejemplo, claros por la tala de árboles, carriles de arrastre, caminos forestales y áreas de acopio de madera) en las áreas de corta anual de 2014. Las evaluaciones de precisión se realizaron en función de los puntos de validación colectados en el campo después del aprovechamiento. Resultados. Encontramos que el 75% de las clasificaciones binarias (áreas impactadas y no impactadas) tenían precisiones globales medias superiores al 60%, lo que representa una precisión aceptable (40 a 70%), aunque el mapeo de las perturbaciones específicas de la cosecha tuvo poca precisión (<40%). Los índices de vegetación que obtuvieron los mejores resultados fueron el índice de vegetación de diferencia normalizada (NDVI), Tasseled Cap Greenness y Tasseled Cap Wetness. Los ejidos que aplicaron IFM y RIL impactaron un porcentaje menor de sus áreas de corta y menos área de bosque por metro cúbico de madera extraída, a pesar de intensidades de tala similares o mayores que los ejidos sin prácticas mejoradas.

Implicaciones. El monitoreo del impacto por la tala selectiva es importante para mejorar el manejo forestal y la certificación de sostenibilidad. Conclusiones. El mapeo y el monitoreo de los impactos de la tala selectiva por gestores y técnicos forestales se puede realizar de manera costo-efectiva utilizando imágenes LANDSAT 8, aunque la precisión se puede mejorar con imágenes de alta resolución.

Resumen en inglés

Background. Mapping selective logging impacts on the Yucatan Peninsula is important to pursuing carbon emissions reduction and biodiversity conservation goals. Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of applying remote sensing techniques using LANDSAT 8 OLI imagery to detect tropical forest disturbance from timber harvesting in four communally managed forests (ejidos). We further assess differences among them in terms of implementing improved forest management (IFM) and reduced impact logging (RIL). Methodology. Vegetation indices were calculated, and forest cover classification was performed to map logged and unlogged forest and specific harvest disturbances (e.g. felling gaps, skid trails, logging roads and log landings) in annual cutting areas of 2014. Accuracy assessments were conducted based on validation points collected in the field after logging. Results. We found that 75% of the binary classifications (logged and unlogged forest) had mean overall accuracies greater than 60%, representing a fair (40 to 70%) accuracy, although mapping of specific harvesting disturbances had poor accuracy (<40%). Vegetation indices that performed the best were normalized vegetation index (NDVI), Tasseled Cap Greenness and Tasseled Cap Wetness. Ejidos that applied IFM and RIL impacted a smaller percentage of their cutting areas and less area of forest per cubic meter of timber extracted, despite similar or higher logging intensities than ejidos without improved practices. Implication. Monitoring selective logging disturbance is important to improved forest management and certification of sustainability. Conclusion. Mapping and monitoring impacts from selective logging by forest managers and technicians can be performed in a cost-efficient manner using LANDSAT 8 images, although accuracy could be improved with higher resolution imagery.


7.
Tesis - Maestría
Bacterias asociadas a árboles tropicales en zonas de recuperación de un disturbio antrópico / Ángel Antonio Becerra Lucio
Becerra Lucio, Ángel Antonio (autor) ; Peña Ramírez, Yuri Jorge Jesús (Director) ; Chávez Bárcenas, Ana Tztzqui (Codirectora) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (Asesora) ;
Lerma, Campeche, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2019
Clasificación: TE/579.17097264 / B4
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
ECO040006967 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Índice

Agradecimientos
Capítulo 1. Introducción
Capítulo 2. Artículo científico
Introducción
Materiales y métodos
Resultados
Discusión
Literatura Citada
Figuras complementarias
Capítulo 3. Conclusiones
Literatura citada


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Carbon storage in a silvopastoral system compared to that in a deciduous dry forest in Michoacán, Mexico
López Santiago, José Germain (autor) ; Casanova Lugo, Fernando (autor) ; Villanueva López, Gilberto (autor) ; Díaz Echeverria, Víctor Francisco (autor) ; Solorio Sánchez, Francisco Javier (autor) ; Martínez Zurimendi, Pablo (autor) ; Aryal, Deb Raj (autor) ; Chay Canul, Alfonso Juventino (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Agroforestry Systems Vol. 93, no. 1 (Fabruary 2019), p. 199-211 ISSN: 0167-4366
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Livestock production in the tropics contributes significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions, so better understanding the role of silvopastoral systems (SPS) in mitigating such emissions is necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the amounts of carbon stored in the biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) components of a Leucaena leucocephala cum Panicum maximum silvopasture system (SPS) compared to a deciduous tropical forest (DTF), and a grass monoculture (GM) in Michoacán, Mexico. The above- and below-ground biomass were measured by destructive sampling in the SPS and GM, while previously reported allometric equations were used to quantify biomass stocks in the DTF. The SOC concentration up to 30 cm was determined by dry combustion method. The SPS and DTF contained more aboveground biomass (41.8 ± 3.30 and 36.7 ± 5.72 Mg DM ha−¹) compared to GM (8.0 ± 0.76 Mg DM ha−¹). However, the SPS exhibited greater belowground biomass (16.4 ± 1.95 Mg DM ha−¹) than the other systems. The DTF had the highest SOC fraction in all depth classes with values ranging from 3.1 ± 0.07% to 3.7 ± 0.06%, respectively, compared to the other systems. The total carbon stocks in SPS was similar to DTF (120.7 ± 10.97 vs. 120.9 ± 6.38 Mg C ha−¹) but was significantly higher than GM (78.2 ± 8.41 Mg C ha−¹). In dry tropical conditions, SPS displays enormous potential for increasing biomass and soil carbon stocks compared to the GM and can thus be used as a greenhouse gas mitigation strategy in livestock production systems.


9.
Artículo
Combining LiDAR data and airborne imagery of very high resolution to improve aboveground biomass estimates in tropical dry forests
Reyes Palomeque, Gabriela (autora) ; Manuel Dupuy, Juan (autor) ; Johnson, Kristofer D. (autor) ; Castillo Santiago, Miguel Ángel (autor) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Forestry An International Journal of Forest Research Volume 92, número 5 (October 2019), p. 599–615 ISSN: 1464-3626
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Knowledge of the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) is crucial to guide forest conservation and management to maintain carbon stocks. LiDAR has been highly successful for this purpose, but has limited availability. Very-high resolution (<1 m) orthophotos can also be used to estimate AGB because they allow a fine distinction of forest canopy grain. We evaluated the separate and joint performance of orthophotos and LiDAR data to estimate AGB in two types of tropical dry forests in the Yucatan Peninsula. Woody plants were surveyed in twenty 0.1 ha plots in a semideciduous forest at Kaxil Kiuic Biocultural Reserve (RBKK) and 28 plots in a semievergreen forest at Felipe Carrillo Puerto (FCP). We fitted three regression models: one based on LiDAR data, another based on orthophoto variables calculated for forest canopy and canopy opening fractions, and a third model that combined both sets of variables. Variation in AGB was decomposed into LiDAR, orthophotos and joint components using variation-partitioning analyses. In FCP, regression models using LiDAR data only showed higher fit (R2 = 0.82) than orthophoto variables only (R² = 0.70). In contrast, orthophotos had a slightly higher fit (R² = 0.91) than LiDAR (R2 = 0.88) in RBKK, because orthophoto variables characterize very well the horizontal structure of canopies on this site. The model that combined both data sets showed a better fit (R2 = 0.85) only in FCP, which has a more complex forest structure. The largest percentage of AGB variation (88 per cent in RBKK and 67 per cent in FCP) was explained by the joint contribution of LiDAR and orthophotos. We conclude that both LiDAR and orthophotos provide accurate estimation of AGB, but their relative performance varies with forest type and structural complexity. Combining the two sets of variables can further improve the accuracy of AGB estimation, particularly in forests with complex vegeta


10.
Artículo
Conocimiento tradicional medicinal de árboles tropicales y su valor para la restauración de bosques tropicales
García Flores, Juana (autora) ; González Espinosa, Mario (autor) (1950-) ; Lindig Cisneros, Roberto (autor) ; Casas Fernández, Alejandro (autor) ;
Contenido en: Botanical Sciences Vol. 97, no. 3 (2019), p. 336–354 ISSN: 2007-4476
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Antecedentes. El conocimiento tradicional medicinal (CTM) permite atender necesidades de salud de 80 % de la población mundial y puede servir como guía para recuperar biodiversidad en regiones tropicales, ya que la mayor diversidad de plantas medicinales incluye especies tropicales. Pregunta. ¿Provee el CTM una estrategia para identificar especies arbóreas que por su importancia cultural y ecológica conviene emplear en proyectos de restauración de bosques tropicales? Sitio y fechas . El estudio se realizó en 2015, en cuatro comunidades rurales de la región Sierra de Tabasco, México. Métodos. Con base en revisión bibliográfica se obtuvo un listado de referencia sobre árboles medicinales nativos de la región. Efectuamos entrevistas semiestructuradas y un taller participativo en cada comunidad; se documentaron usos medicinales, enfermedades recurrentes, listados libres de especies medicinales y aquellas con prioridad para emplearse en acciones de restauración. Calculamos índices de riqueza de conocimiento ( IRC ) y de significancia cultural ( ICS ). Resultados. Registramos 45 especies arbóreas medicinales nativas. Las mujeres adultas y ancianas mostraron el mayor CTM. Las principales enfermedades fueron gastrointestinales (93-97 %) y las asociadas a dolores y fiebre (67-97 %), tratadas con 13 y 16 especies, respectivamente. El IRC reflejó un conocimiento promedio menor a 50 %. Gliricidia sepium, Bursera simaruba y Piper auritum tuvieron valores altos de ICS, mientras que Brosimum alicastrum, Ceiba pentandra y Castilla elastica mostraron valores bajos y son consideradas con alta prioridad para la restauración forestal. Conclusiones. El CTM es importante para seleccionar especies arbóreas en la restauración de los bosques tropicales del sureste de México.

Resumen en inglés

Background: Traditional medicinal knowledge (TMK) accounts for attending nearly 80 % of the worldwide needs of health and may guide biodiversity restoration efforts in tropical regions where the greatest diversity of medicinal plants occurs. Questions: Can TMK become a strategy to be used in identifying medicinal tree species, with both cultural and ecological importance, that should be considered in tropical forest restoration actions? Study site and dates: The study was conducted during 2015 in four communities of the Sierra region of southern Tabasco, Mexico. Methods: We obtained from the literature a checklist of medicinal trees native to the study region. We conducted semi-structured interviews and a workshop in each community; we obtained ethnobotanical data about the most common illnesses and the most frequently used plant species for attending them. We identified priority species for forest restoration, and calculated indexes of knowledge richness (IKR) and cultural significance (ICS). Results: We recorded a total of 45 tree species. Adult and elder women showed the highest TMK. The main illnesses detected were gastrointestinal (93-97 %) and those related with pain and fever (67-97 %), which were treated with 13 and 16 species, respectively. On average, the IKR was less than 50 % of all species recorded. Gliricidia sepium, Bursera simaruba and Piper auritum had high ICS values, while Brosimum alicastrum, Ceiba pentandra and Castilla elastica had low values and are considered high priority for forest restoration actions. Conclusions: TMK is important to select tree species in tropical forest restoration actions in southeastern Mexico.


11.
Tesis - Maestría
Resumen en español

El estudio de rizobacterias promotoras de crecimiento vegetal (PGPR) se ha orientado a la interacción de este grupo de bacterias con plantas de interés experimental y agrícola; sin embargo, se conoce poco sobre su efecto en la producción de especies forestales tropicales, como la caoba (Swetenia macrophylla King); cabe mencionar, que esta especie es una de las más utilizadas en lo programas de reforestación con fines de conservación y producción en el sureste mexicano. Su reproducción por lo general se lleva a cabo en viveros y es la calidad de las plantas producidas un factor limitante para el éxito de su establecimiento y sobrevivencia en campo. Se reporta que esta especie presenta lento crecimiento y desarrollo radicular en etapas tempranas de su producción, por lo que en esta investigación se propuso estudiar el efecto de 10 cepas de PGPR en etapas tempranas de desarrollo de caoba. Las cepas de PGPR evaluadas fueron seleccionadas por sus antecedentes de promoción vegetal en especies de interés agrícola y ornamental. El bioensayo se conformó de 10 tratamientos inoculados con cada una cepas bacterianas y un tratamiento control; cada tratamiento contó con 15 plantas en total (5 plantas por repetición) y la duración del experimento fue de tres meses a partir de que se alcanzó el 50% de germinación de las semillas. Las plantas se establecieron bajo el esquema de producción a raíz cubierta, complementándose con una fertilización inicial en ausencia de reguladores de crecimiento, fungicidas y bactericidas. La región 16S del ADNr de las cepas inoculadas se secuenció por el método de Sanger para verificar su identidad y posteriormente su presencia en las raíces se corroboró mediante la secuenciación masiva del 16S del ADNr provenientes de muestras compuesta de dicho tejido.

Los resultados indican que las cepas de PGPR indujeron respuestas distintas en las plantas, principalmente en aumento de biomasa vegetal (expresada en peso seco total); la cepa IPA 47 (Bacillus sp.) presentó un aumento del 39% en la biomasa de hojas, la cepa IPA 38 (B. polyfermenticus) incrementó un 42% en la biomasa de hojas y un 23% tallos, y la cepa IPA 52 (B. siamensis) un 44% en la biomasa de hojas y 30% en la biomasa de raíces. Asimismo, se apreciaron respuestas de sanidad vegetal en los tratamientos inoculados con la IPA 38, IPA 52 e IPA 25 (B. subtilis) debido a que los individuos de los tratamientos no presentaron mortandad. Todas las cepas inoculadas pertenecieron al género Bacillus y su presencia se confirmó en los tratamientos inoculados a excepción del control negativo, donde no se identificaron bacterias de dicho género. Con base en lo anterior, nuestros resultados muestran que algunas cepas de PGPR fueron capaces de inducir incrementos de biomasa aérea y radicular en caoba.

Índice

Dedicatoria y agradecimientos
Índice
Resumen
Capítulo 1. Introducción
1.1 Pregunta de investigación
1.2 Hipótesis
1.3 Objetivo general
1.4 Objetivos particulares
Capítulo 2. Artículo científico
Capítulo 3. Conclusiones
Literatura citada


12.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Holocene paleoecology and paleoclimatology of South and Southeastern Mexico: a palynological and geospatial approach
Islebe, Gerald A. (autor) ; Carrillo Bastos, Alicia (autor) ; Aragón Moreno, Alejandro Antonio (autor) ; Valdéz Hernández, Mirna (autor) ; Torrescano Valle, Nuria (autor) ; Cabanillas Terán, Nancy (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: The holocene and anthropocene environmental history of Mexico: a paleoecological approach on Mesoamerica / editors: Nuria Torrescano Valle, Gerald A. Islebe, Priyadarsi D. Roy Cham, Switzerland : Springer International Publishing, 2019 páginas 195-207 ISBN:978-3-030-31718-8
Bibliotecas: Campeche , Chetumal , San Cristóbal
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SIBE Campeche
59784-30 (Disponible)
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SIBE Chetumal
59784-20 (Disponible)
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59784-10 (Disponible)
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Resumen en español

Reconstruction of Holocene paleoecological conditions and paleoclimate of an area with high biological diversity and a variety of climatic conditions like southern and southeastern Mexico is complex. This region is characterized by vegetation types ranging from tropical forest to high mountain vegetation. Additionally, this region was inhabited by the ancient Maya culture, which shaped the landscape for several millennia. Previous paleoecological studies from this region were focused on the Maya culture-environment relationships, to decipher natural and human-induced deforestation. These studies also aimed to understand the effects of climatic regional forcing (El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the natural vegetation. In this chapter we review the paleoecological results and present a new geospatial approach to analyze past precipitation and tropical forest distribution of the Yucatán Peninsula from 1 AD to 1700 AD in 100-year intervals. The geospatial analysis revealed heterogeneity in spatial patterns of precipitation and tropical forest extension during the Late Preclassic, Terminal Classic, and Medieval Warm Period to Little Ice Age transition. The dry periods of the Middle and Late Holocene in the Yucatán Peninsula and southern Mexico can be chronologically placed in the following intervals: 4700–3600 cal year BP, 3400–2500 cal year BP, 2300–2100 cal year BP, 1900–1700 cal year BP, 1400–1300 cal year BP, 730 cal year BP, and 560 cal year BP. We conclude that this region requires additional studies with strong chronological framework due to its heterogeneous environmental conditions.


13.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Insights of the movements of the jaguar in the tropical forests of southern Mexico
De la Torre, José Antonio (autor) ; Rivero Hernández, Crysia Marina (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 páginas 217-241
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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10933-20 (Disponible)
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Movement is a critical animal behavior which reflects animal response to its current biological needs and to its environment. Comprehending how and why the animals use the available space and the underlying drivers of animal movements is essential to the management and conservation for both species and ecosystems. This chapter aims to understand and describe the movements of the largest felid of the Neotropics, the jaguar (Panthera onca), through different approaches with the purpose to contribute to the existing knowledge of the spatial ecology of this species and to design strong conservation actions for the jaguar in the tropical forest of Central America. We described the movement ecology of jaguars in tropical forests using the information of five individuals fitted with satellite GPS collars in the Greater Lacandona Ecosystem, Chiapas, Mexico. We estimate the home range of jaguars through the autocorrelated kernel density estimation and compare it with different studies implemented throughout the species range. Using the movement-based kernel approach analyzed under the biased random bridge model, we identify the areas that were intensively used and repeatedly visited by the jaguars inside their home range.

The biased random bridge allowed having a more dynamic and realistic approach to describe the space use and habitat selection by jaguars which complement the information about the movements of the species for the region. Finally, we evaluate the movement decisions of jaguars by the step selection function to identify which landscape variables influence the movement behavior of the species in the Greater Lacandona Ecosystem. The development of new movement models and analytical tools have allowed to make more precise inferences regarding the space use and movements of secretive tropical species such as the jaguar which should translate in better conservation strategies to ensure their long-term conservation.


14.
Libro
Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors
Disponible en línea: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals.
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (editor) ; Chapman, Colin A. (editor) ;
Geneva, Switzerland : Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2019
Clasificación: EE/599.098 / M6
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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ECO040006971 (Disponible)
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Índice | Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This book brings a unique perspective to animal movement studies because all cases came from tropical environments where the great diversity, either biological and structurally (trees, shrubs, vines, epiphytes), presents the animal with several options to fulfill its live requirements. These conditions have forced the evolution of unique movement patterns and ecological strategies. Movement is an essential process in the life of all organisms. Animals move because they are hungry, thirsty, to avoid being eaten, or because they want to find mates. Understanding the causes and consequences of animal movement is not an easy task for behavioural ecologists. Many animals are shy, move in secretive ways and are very sensible to human presence, therefore, studying the movements of mammals in tropical environments present logistical and methodological challenges that have recently started to be solved by ecologist around the world. In this book we are compiling a set of extraordinary cases where researchers have used some of the modern technology and the strongest methodological approaches to understand movement patterns in wild tropical mammals. We hope this book will inspire and encourage young researchers to investigate wild mammal´s movements in some of the amazing tropical environments of the world.

Índice

1 Why Movement Ecology Matters
2 The Impact of Hurricane Otto on Baird’s Tapir Movement in Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve
3 White-Lipped Peccary Home-Range Size in the Maya Forest of Guatemala and México
4 White-Lipped Peccary Movement and Range in Agricultural Lands of Central Brazil
5 Movements of White-Lipped Peccary in French Guiana
6 Spatial Ecology of a Large and Endangered Tropical Mammal: The White-Lipped Peccary in Darién, Panama
7 Movements of Neotropical Forest Deer: What Do We Know?
8 Daily Traveled Distances by the White-Tailed Deer in Relation to Seasonality and Reproductive Phenology in a Tropical Lowland of Southeastern Mexico
9 Terrestrial Locomotion and Other Adaptive Behaviors in Howler Monkeys (Alouatta pigra) Living in Forest Fragments
10 Variation in Space Use and Social Cohesion Within and Between Four Groups of Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha poeppigii) in Relation to Fruit Availability and Mating Opportunities at the Tiputini Biodiversity Station, Ecuador
11 Home Range and Daily Traveled Distances of Highland Colombian Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix lagothricha lugens): Comparing Spatial Data from GPS Collars and Direct Follows
12 Ranging Responses to Fruit and Arthropod Availability by a Tufted Capuchin Group (Sapajus apella) in the Colombian Amazon
13 Insights of the Movements of the Jaguar in the Tropical Forests of Southern Mexico
14 Movements and Home Range of Jaguars (Panthera onca) and Mountain Lions (Puma concolor) in a Tropical Dry Forest of Western Mexico
15 Next Moves: The Future of Neotropical Mammal Movement Ecology
Index


15.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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Next moves: the future of neotropical mammal movement ecology
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 página 263-267 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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SIBE Campeche
10934-20 (Disponible)
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This book compiles a remarkable array of studies dealing with Neotropical mammal movement patterns and therefore presents a unique opportunity to analyze the state of the art of movement ecology of some of the rarest and secretive species that are top predators, important prey to those predators, and/or critical to maintaining the ecosystem services of the forest ecosystems they inhabit. In this last chapter, we attempt to summarize lessons learned from all chapters and advance the field with respect to our understanding of the causes and consequences of animal movements in tropical forests.


16.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Rebrote arbóreo en la regeneración del bosque tropical de Calakmul, Campeche, México
Haas Ek, María Alejandra (autora) ; González Valdivia, Noel Antonio (autor) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autora) ; Aryal, Deb Raj (coaut.) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Revista de Biologia Tropical Vol. 67, no. 1 (March 2019), p. 164-181 ISSN: 0034-7744
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Resumen en: Español | Inglés |
Resumen en español

Los estudios detallados para comprender como los bosques neotropicales se reestablecen en el tiempo, a través de la sucesión secundaria aún resultan necesarios. Entre los mecanismos de regeneración que actúan en los bosques tropicales, el rebrote de árboles predomina en especies leñosas, con la ventaja de reiniciar el crecimiento de raíces establecidas, que permiten restituir el dosel forestal. El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar y cuantificar las especies arbóreas con capacidad de rebrote en distintas etapas de la sucesión secundaria (barbecho) después del sistema agrícola tradicional de milpa, comparadas con las comunidades del bosque tropical predominante en la Reserva de la Biósfera de Calakmul, y cómo influyen estas especies en la recuperación de la composición de este ecosistema. Se calculó el porcentaje de especies con y sin rebrote para cada etapa sucesional. Se registraron 13 972 individuos (32 % con rebrote y 68 % sin rebrote) y 168 especies (79 % con rebrote y 21 % sin rebrote), el porcentaje de individuos con rebrote va disminuyendo conforme avanza la edad de la sucesión. El número de individuos con rebrote y la composición de especies fueron significativamente diferentes entre etapas. Se puede concluir que la mayoría de especies arbóreas del bosque en Calakmul, presentan la capacidad de rebrotar, lo cual tiene influencia en el rápido proceso sucesional del bosque después de la roza-tumba y quema, restituyendo la cobertura y estructura forestal, así como la composición de las especies originales.

Resumen en inglés

Detailed studies to understand recovering of Neotropical forests over time, through secondary succession, are still necessaries. Between acting mechanisms of regeneration in the tropical forests, the arboreal resprout predominates in woody species, with the advantage of restart the growth from still rooting plants, allowing the restoring of forest canopy. The study aim was to identify and quantify the tree species with resprouting capacity in different stages of secondary succession (tree-fallow) after the traditional milpa agricultural system, compared with tropical forest communities in the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve and, enlightening how these species influences the recovery of the composition of this ecosystem. Was calculated the proportions of species with or without resprouting by successional stage. There were 13972 individuals (32 % resprouting and 68 % not resprouting) and 168 species (79 % resprouting and 21 % not resprouting), the percentage of individuals regrowing decreases as the successional stage progresses. The number of individuals resprouting and species composition were significantly different between successional stages. In conclusion, mostly arboreal species in the region of Calakmul, can regrow, which influences the successional development of the forest after slash-and-burn, helping to restore the coverage, structure, as well as species composition original.


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The role of invasive species in ecosystem functioning represents one of the mainchallenges in ecology.Pteridium aquilinumis a successful cosmopolitan invasive specieswith negative effects on the ecological mechanisms that allow secondary succession. Inthis study, we evaluated the influence of P. aquilinumon secondary succession underdifferent disturbances in a seasonal dry forest of the Yucatán Peninsula. We determined species richness, composition and the relative importance value in four sampling units. Fabaceae followed by Asteraceae, Meliaceae, Rubiaceae, Sapindaceae and Verbenaceaewere the most species rich families. A dissimilarity analysis determined significant differences in beta diversity between sampling units. With a generalized linear model wefound that species richness was best explained by site conditions, followed by calciumand soil organic matter. Also, the generalized linear model showed that abundanceresulted in a strong correlation with site conditions and soil characteristics. Specific soil conditions related to phosphoro and calcium were also detected as beneficiary tothe successional processes. Our results suggest that applying fire restriction and periodiccutting of the bracken fern, this can increase a higher diversity of species.


18.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Succession and the relationship between vegetation and soil in the Marl Quarries of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Valdéz Hernández, Mirna (autora) ; Gil Medina, Rossana (autora) ; López Martínez, Jorge Omar (autor) ; Torrescano Valle, Nuria (autora) ; Cabanillas Terán, Nancy (autora) ; Islebe, Gerald A. (autor) ;
Contenido en: Forests Vol. 10, no. 116 (2019), p. 1-13 ISSN: 1999-4907
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19.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, Lourens (autor) ; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A. (autora) ; Bongers, Frans (autor) ; Almeida Cortez, Jarcilene Silva (autora) ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María (autora) ; Álvarez, Francisco S. (autor) ; Andrade, José Luis (autor) ; Arreola Villa, Luis Felipe (autor) ; Balvanera, Patricia (autora) ; Becknell, Justin M. (autor) ; Bentos, Tony V. (autor) ; Bhaskar, Radika (autora) ; Boukili, Vanessa (autora) ; Brancalion, Pedro H. S. (autor) ; Broadbent, Eben North (autor) ; César, Ricardo G. (autor) ; Chave, Jerome (autor) ; Chazdon, Robin L. (autor) ; Dalla Colletta, Gabriel (autor) ; Craven, Dylan (autor) ; De Jong, Bernardus Hendricus Jozeph (autor) ; Denslow, Julie Sloan (autora) ; Dent, Daisy H. (autora) ; DeWalt, Saara J. (autora) ; Díaz García, Elisa (autora) ; Dupuy Rada, Juan Manuel (autor) ; Durán, Sandra M. (autora) ; Espírito Santo, Mario M. (autor) ; Fandiño, María C. (autora) ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson (autor) ; Finegan, Bryan (autor) ; Granda Moser, Vanessa (autora) ; Hall, Jefferson S. (autor) ; Hernández Stefanoni, José Luis (autor) ; Jakovac, Catarina C. (autora) ; Junqueira, André B. (autor) ; Kennard, Deborah (autra) ; Lebrija Trejos, Edwin (autor) ; Letcher, Susan G. (autora) ; Lohbeck, Madelon (autora) ; López, Omar R. (autor) ; Marín Spiotta, Erika (autora) ; Martínez Ramos, Miguel (autor) ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio (autor) ; Massoca, Paulo E. S. (autor) ; Meave, Jorge A. (autor) ; Mesquita, Rita C. G (autora) ; Mora Ardila, Francisco (autor) ; Moreno, Vanessa de Souza (autora) ; Müller, Sandra C. (autora) ; Muñoz, Rodrigo (autor) ; Muscarella, Robert (autor) ; Nolasco de Oliveira Neto, Silvio (autor) ; Nunes, Yule R. F. (autor) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (autora) ; Paz, Horacio (autor) ; Peña Claros, Marielos (autor) ; Piotto, Daniel (autor) ; Ruíz, Jorge (autor) ; Sanaphre Villanueva, Lucía (autora) ; Sánchez Azofeifa, Gerardo Arturo (autor) ; Schwartz, Naomi B. (autora) ; Steininger, Marc K. (autor) ; Thomas, William Wayt (autor) ; Toledo, Marisol (autora) ; Uriarte, María (autora) ; Utrera, Luis P. (autor) ; van Breugel, Michiel (autor) ; van der Sande, Masha T. (coaut.) ; Van Der Wal, Hans (coaut.) ; Veloso, María D. M. (autora) ; Vester, Henricus F. M. (autor) ; Vieira, Ima Celia G. (autora) ; Villa, Pedro Manuel (autor) ; Williamson, G. Bruce (autor) ; Wright, S. Joseph (autor) ; Zanini, Kátia J. (autora) ; Zimmerman, Jess K. (autor) ; Westoby, Mark (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Nature Ecology & Evolution Vol. 3, no. 6 (Jun 2019), p. 928–934 ISSN: 2397-334X
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking. Here, we analyse forest recovery using 1,403 plots that differ in age since agricultural abandonment from 50 sites across the Neotropics. We analyse changes in community composition using species-specific stem wood density (WD), which is a key trait for plant growth, survival and forest carbon storage. In wet forest, succession proceeds from low towards high community WD (acquisitive towards conservative trait values), in line with standard successional theory. However, in dry forest, succession proceeds from high towards low community WD (conservative towards acquisitive trait values), probably because high WD reflects drought tolerance in harsh early successional environments. Dry season intensity drives WD recovery by influencing the start and trajectory of succession, resulting in convergence of the community WD over time as vegetation cover builds up. These ecological insights can be used to improve species selection for reforestation. Reforestation species selected to establish a first protective canopy layer should, among other criteria, ideally have a similar WD to the early successional communities that dominate under the prevailing macroclimatic conditions.


20.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
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White-lipped peccary home-range size in the maya forest of Guatemala and México
Moreira Ramírez, José Fernando (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Hidalgo Mihart, Mircea Gabriel (autor) ; Naranjo Piñera, Eduardo Jorge (autor) (1963-) ; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar (autor) ; García Anleu, Rony (autor) ; McNab, Roan (autor) ; Radachowsky, Jeremy (autor) ; Mérida, Melvin (autor) ; Briceño Méndez, Marcos Alberto (autor) ; Ponce Santizo, Gabriela (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 página 21-37 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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SIBE Campeche
9787-30 (Disponible)
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari, Link 1795) is a social ungulate that lives in large groups and performs large movements across tropical forest searching for food and water. White-lipped peccaries are an important food source among rural communities. Nevertheless, excessive hunting has caused the extirpation of this species from several areas in the Neotropics where it was previously common. Throughout its range it is considered vulnerable according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, but the Mesoamerican population has decreased in the last 20 years at alarming rates. Using satellite GPS collars, kernel density estimate (KDE), minimum convex polygon (MCP), and the autocorrelated kernel density estimation (AKDE), we estimated the spatial requirements of four white-lipped peccary groups in three sites with different levels of hunting pressure in the Maya Forest of Guatemala and México. Our results showed that the home range estimated in non-hunted sites were smaller than in hunted sites. The 95% KDE home range for non-hunted areas ranged between 40 and 99 km2, substantially smaller than that of the hunted area at 140 km2. Similarly, the 95% AKDE area estimates for non-hunted sites ranged from 62 to 156 km2, while for the hunted site, the 95% AKDE estimate was 312 km2. In non-hunted sites, dry season home ranges were constrained to the close vicinity of water ponds, whereas during the rainy season white-lipped peccary groups were more mobile.

In contrast, the home range was larger in the hunted site during the dry season compared with rainy season. Our results suggest that hunting pressure in the Maya Forest is probably affecting the behavior and ecology of the peccary group, causing them to move through larger areas with lower group size in hunted areas compared to non-hunted areas. We hope that these results encourage more studies focused on estimating white-lipped peccary home-range size in areas with hunting pressure and human activities.


21.
Tesis - Maestría
Apropiación social de los recursos forestales en el ejido Nuevo Conhuas, región Calakmul, Campeche / Claudia Alicia Hernández López
Hernández López, Claudia Alicia (autora) ; Ochoa Gaona, Susana (Directora) ; Bello Baltazar, Eduardo (Asesor) (1960-) ; Monzón Alvarado, Claudia María (Asesora) ;
Lerma, Campeche, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2018
Clasificación: TE/306.097264152 / H4
Bibliotecas: Campeche
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SIBE Campeche
ECO040006861 (Disponible)
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Índice | Resumen en: Español |
Resumen en español

La gestión de los recursos naturales es uno de los problemas socioambientales que enfrenta el mundo. La relación entre sociedad y recursos naturales se vincula con la forma de apropiación del espacio. Con base en el marco teórico-metodológico de la apropiación social, se analizan en los niveles de comunidad agraria y doméstico la apropiación social de los recursos forestales en el ejido Nuevo Conhuas, Calakmul. Se realizaron entrevistas semiestructuradas: a nivel comunidad, 14 a informantes clave y, a nivel doméstico, 24 a unidades familiares. Las técnicas fueron la bola de nieve hasta llegar al punto de saturación, la observación participante y el diario de campo. La interpretación de la información se realizó mediante el análisis inductivo. Se encontró que en Nuevo Conhuas el bosque tropical ha tenido un papel fundamental durante la apropiación social. A nivel comunidad, las políticas de explotación forestal y de colonización del trópico influyeron en la construcción social del territorio, de un grupo maya con cultura forestal se reconfiguró a un grupo social heterogéneo que definió normas sobre el territorio y los recursos forestales. Las políticas de conservación restringen la gestión de los recursos y el desarrollo de actividades productivas. A nivel doméstico, las familias priorizan la agricultura, las prácticas pecuarias bovina, ovina y apícola, y la plantación de naranjal. Las formas de apropiación de estas prácticas productivas mantienen de mayor a menor grado la vegetación boscosa nativa, siendo la práctica de plantación de naranjal la que elimina estos recursos permanentemente.

Índice

Dedicatoria
Agradecimientos
Resumen
Estructura general de la tesis
Capítulo I
1. Introducción
1.1 Contexto regional
2. Objetivos de la investigación
3. Descripción de la zona de estudio
4. Métodos
Capítulo II
2 Apropiación social del territorio y su relación con los recursos forestales desde el nivel comunidad. 2.1 Nuevo Conhuas dentro del contexto de la región de Calakmul: relación entre las categorías subjetiva y la toma de decisiones
2.2 Los recursos naturales y las prácticas productivas en Nuevo Conhuas: reflejo de la categoría concreta
2.2.1 Conocimientos de los recursos naturales presentes en el territorio
2.2.2 Desarrollo de las prácticas productivas en el territorio
2.3 Instituciones establecidas en el ejido para el acceso, uso y control del territorio y de los recursos forestales: relación entre las categorías de normas y abstracta
2.3.1 Organización social del ejido, mecanismos de supervisión y sanciones
2.3.2 Límites para la explotación de los recursos de uso común
2.3.3 Derecho de propiedad y mecanismos de exclusión
2.3.4 Mecanismos de transferencia de derechos de propiedad
2.4 Nuevo Conhuas un sistema complejo: percepciones sobre la comunidad agraria

Capítulo III
3 Apropiación social de los recursos forestales bajo diversas prácticas productivas en la región de Calakmul, Campeche
3.1 Resumen
3.2 Introducción
3.2.1 Contexto regional
3.2.2 Marco teórico-metodológico
3.3 Objetivo
3.4 Materiales y métodos
3.4.1 Descripción de la zona de estudio
3.4.2 Métodos
3.5 Resultados
3.5.1 Contexto social del ejido Nuevo Conhuas
3.5.2 Prácticas productivas en Nuevo Conhuas
3.5.2.1 Apropiación subjetiva de los recursos forestales en función de las prácticas productivas
3.5.2.2 Apropiación concreta de los recursos forestales en función de las prácticas productivas 3.5.2.2.1 Especies y usos de los recursos forestales
3.5.2.2.2 Conocimiento de los recursos forestales
3.5.2.2.3 Manejo de los recursos forestales
3.5.2.3 Apropiación abstracta de los recursos forestales en función de las prácticas productivas
3.6 Discusiones
3.6.1 Relación entre las formas de apropiación de los recursos forestales de las prácticas productivas y la conservación de la vegetación
3.6.2 Perspectivas
3.7 Conclusiones
3.8 Reconocimientos
3.9 Referencias
Capítulo IV
Conclusión
Referencias
Anexos
Anexo 1. Formatos de entrevistas a nivel comunidad agraria
Anexo 2. Formato de entrevista a nivel unidad familiar


22.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Effects of long-term inter-annual rainfall variation on the dynamics of regenerative communities during the old-field succession of a neotropical dry forest
Martínez Ramos, Miguel ; Balvanera, Patricia (coaut.) ; Arreola Villa, Felipe (coaut.) ; Mora Ardila, Francisco (coaut.) ; Maass, José Manuel (coaut.) ; Maza Villalobos Méndez, Susana (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Forest Ecology and Management Vol. 426, (October 2018), p. 91-100 ISSN: 0378-1127
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Resumen en: Inglés |
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Effects of long-term rainfall inter-annual variation on regeneration dynamics of tropical dry forests (TDF) are still poorly understood. Such understanding is particularly important to assess the regeneration potential of TDF in landscapes subjected to slash-and-burn farming management. Here, we studied from 2004 to 2016 the effects of inter-annual rainfall variation on the dynamics of regenerative communities of woody species during the old-field succession of a TDF in Western Mexico. Over the study period a severe drought, caused by an El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event in 2005, and two hurricanes (Jova, 2011, magnitude 2; Patricia, 2015, magnitude 4) were experienced. In 2004, we established a chronosequence of abandoned cattle pastures and old-growth forest sites, which were assigned to four successional categories, each one with three sites: Pasture (0–3 years fallow age), Early (3–5 years), Intermediate (8–12 years), and Old-Growth Forest (without any human disturbance). At each site, seedlings, saplings and resprouts 10–100 cm height of shrub and tree species were tagged, taxonomically identified, measured in height and monitored over 12 continuous year intervals. At each year, all new plants reaching 10 cm height were recorded and considered as recruits. Community rates (recruitment, relative growth rate in height, mortality, species gain and species loss) were calculated per year, considering all plants combined and separating shrub from tree species. All community rates varied notoriously in response to temporal rainfall variability, with almost null interaction with successional category. As expected, mortality and species loss rates declined as the amount of rainfall increased, especially when precipitation of the current and the previous year were taken into account; these rates peaked in the ENSO year and were still high in the following year.

Unexpectedly, recruitment and species gain rates also declined with the increase in rainfall, especially with the amount of rainfall in the current year. Overall, community rates of tree species were more responsive than those of shrub species to temporal rainfall variation. The ENSO-related drought event produced a short and transient instability in the plant density and species density of regenerative communities. However, ENSO effects were smoothed out by subsequent rainy years, leading to a net increase in plant density and species density in all successional categories, especially in the younger one. Overall, our study shows that global (e.g. ENSO) and regional (e.g. storms, hurricanes) climate factors play a key role on forest succession, modulating the speed of the TDF regeneration dynamics. We conclude that low impact agricultural land use and the presence of good levels of remnant forest cover in the landscape confers a high potential for regeneration in abandoned agricultural fields, even under the impact of severe droughts and severe hurricanes.


23.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Accurate estimates of above ground biomass (AGB) are needed for monitoring carbon in tropical forests. LiDAR data can provide precise AGB estimations because it can capture the horizontal and vertical structure of vegetation. However, the accuracy of AGB estimations from LiDAR is affected by a co-registration error between LiDAR data and field plots resulting in spatial discrepancies between LiDAR and field plot data. Here, we evaluated the impacts of plot location error and plot size on the accuracy of AGB estimations predicted from LiDAR data in two types of tropical dry forests in Yucatán, México. We sampled woody plants of three size classes in 29 nested plots (80 m², 400 m² and 1000 m²) in a semi-deciduous forest (Kiuic) and 28 plots in a semi-evergreen forest (FCP) and estimated AGB using local allometric equations. We calculated several LiDAR metrics from airborne data and used a Monte Carlo simulation approach to assess the influence of plot location errors (2 to 10 m) and plot size on ABG estimations from LiDAR using regression analysis. Our results showed that the precision of AGB estimations improved as plot size increased from 80 m² to 1000 m² (R² = 0.33 to 0.75 and 0.23 to 0.67 for Kiuic and FCP respectively). We also found that increasing GPS location errors resulted in higher AGB estimation errors, especially in the smallest sample plots. In contrast, the largest plots showed consistently lower estimation errors that varied little with plot location error. We conclude that larger plots are less affected by co-registration error and vegetation conditions, highlighting the importance of selecting an appropriate plot size for field forest inventories used for estimating biomass.


24.
Artículo
New records of Orchidaceae Juss. for the state from Hidalgo, Mexico
Hernández Orta, Carlos Alberto (autor) ; Aguilar Dorantes, Karla María (autor) ; Morales Linares, Jonas (autor) ; Bertolini, Vincenzo (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Check List Vol. 15, no. 5 (2019), p. 827-832 ISSN: 1809-127X
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Two new orchid records are reported for Hidalgo, Notylia barkeri Lindl. and Trichocentrum cosymbephorum (C. Morren) R. Jiménez & Carnevali. The genus Notylia is reported for the first time, and the list of orchid flora is updated to include 110 taxa. Unexpectedly, the species were recorded in abandoned orange plantations rather than natural vegetation, likely because of the high anthropogenic pressure exerted on their natural populations. These new records highlight the importance of continuing to survey regions such as Hidalgo with scarce orchid records, including both natural and modified vegetation.


25.
- Artículo con arbitraje
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Reduced dry season transpiration is coupled with shallow soil water use in tropical montane forest trees
Muñoz Villers, Lyssette Elena ; Holwerda, Friso (coaut.) ; Alvarado Barrientos, María Susana (coaut.) ; Geissert, Daniel R. (coaut.) ; Dawson, Todd E. (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Oecologia Vol. 188, no. 1 (September 2018), p. 303-317 ISSN: 1432-1939
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Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are ecosystems particularly sensitive to climate change; however, the effects of warmer and drier conditions on TMCF ecohydrology remain poorly understood. To investigate functional responses of TMCF trees to reduced water availability, we conducted a study during the 2014 dry season in the lower altitudinal limit of TMCF in central Veracruz, Mexico. Temporal variations of transpiration, depth of water uptake and tree water sources were examined for three dominant, brevi-deciduous species using micrometeorological, sap flow and soil moisture measurements, in combination with oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope composition of rainfall, tree xylem, soil and stream water. Over the course of the dry season, reductions in crown conductance and transpiration were observed in canopy species (43 and 34%, respectively) and mid-story trees (23 and 8%), as atmospheric demand increased and soil moisture decreased. Canopy species consistently showed more depleted isotope values compared to mid-story trees. However, MixSIAR Bayesian model results showed that the evaporated (enriched) soil water pool was the main source for trees despite reduced soil moisture. Additionally, while increases in tree water uptake from deeper to shallower soil water sources occurred, concomitant decreases in transpiration were observed as the dry season progressed. A larger reduction in deep soil water use was observed for canopy species (from 79 ± 19 to 24 ± 20%) compared to mid-story trees (from 12 ± 17 to 10 ± 12%). The increase in shallower soil water sources may reflect a trade-off between water and nutrient requirements in this forest.