Términos relacionados

524 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Conducta animal
11.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Next moves: the future of neotropical mammal movement ecology
Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 página 263-267 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
10934-20 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This book compiles a remarkable array of studies dealing with Neotropical mammal movement patterns and therefore presents a unique opportunity to analyze the state of the art of movement ecology of some of the rarest and secretive species that are top predators, important prey to those predators, and/or critical to maintaining the ecosystem services of the forest ecosystems they inhabit. In this last chapter, we attempt to summarize lessons learned from all chapters and advance the field with respect to our understanding of the causes and consequences of animal movements in tropical forests.


PDF PDF
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The sterile insect technique (SIT) may offer a means to control the transmission of mosquito borne diseases. SIT involves the release of male insects that have been sterilized by exposure to ionizing radiation. We determined the effects of different doses of radiation on the survival and reproductive capacity of local strains of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in southern Mexico. The survival of irradiated pupae was invariably greater than 90% and did not differ significantly in either sex for either species. Irradiation had no significant adverse effects on the flight ability (capacity to fly out of a test device) of male mosquitoes, which consistently exceeded 91% in Ae. aegypti and 96% in Ae. albopictus. The average number of eggs laid per female was significantly reduced in Ae. aegypti at doses of 15 and 30 Gy and no eggs were laid by females that had been exposed to 50 Gy. Similarly, in Ae. albopictus, egg production was reduced at doses of 15 and 25 Gy and was eliminated at 35 Gy. In Ae. aegypti, fertility in males was eliminated at 70 Gy and was eliminated at 30 Gy in females, whereas in Ae. albopictus, the fertility of males that mated with untreated females was almost zero (0.1%) in the 50 Gy treatment and female fertility was eliminated at 35 Gy. Irradiation treatments resulted in reduced ovary length and fewer follicles in both species. The adult median survival time of both species was reduced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. However, sterilizing doses of 35 Gy and 50 Gy resulted in little reduction in survival times of males of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti, respectively, indicating that these doses should be suitable for future evaluations of SIT-based control of these species. The results of the present study will be applied to studies of male sexual competitiveness and to stepwise evaluations of the sterile insect technique for population suppression of these vectors in Mexico.


13.
Tesis - Maestría
*En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con el bibliotecario(a) de SIBE-Chetumal
Patrones de actividad y abundancia relativa de especies presa de Panthera onca y Puma concolor en un paisaje modificado en el centro de Belice / Yahaira Liduvina Urbina
Liduvina Urbina, Yahaira ; Cedeño-Vázquez, J.R. (director) ; Ramírez Barajas, Pablo Jesús (asesor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (asesor) ;
Chetumal, Quintana Roo, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 2019
Clasificación: TE/599.744280972 / L5
Nota: En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con el bibliotecario(a) de SIBE-Chetumal
Resumen en español

Es importante comprender los efectos que las actividades antropogénicas tienen sobre las especies presa de grandes felinos, ya que ellas cumplen funciones vitales en el ecosistema y a menudo son una fuente de proteínas para las personas en las zonas rurales. En este estudio se evaluó el Índice de Abundancia Relativa (IAR) y los patrones de actividad de cinco especies presa de jaguar y puma (Dasypus novemcinctus, Cuniculus paca, Odocoileus virginianus, Dasyprocta punctata y Pecari tajacu) en un paisaje modificado en el centro de Belice; así como los factores que influyen en el comportamiento y el IAR de las especies presa. Se analizaron datos de 29 estaciones de cámaras trampa distribuidas en el valle del Río Belice. Se evaluó la influencia del hábitat y los factores antropogénicos sobre el IAR de las especies presa. Además, se analizaron las diferencias en los patrones de actividad de las especies de presas y estimamos la superposición con la actividad de depredadores, personas y perros domésticos. Los resultados sugieren que el venado cola blanca y el agutí son más abundantes que las otras tres especies en el área de estudio. El venado cola blanca evitó los asentamientos humanos, pero fue asociado con área agrícolas. Su comportamiento catemeral hizo que se traslape en actividad con los depredadores, pero también con los humanos y los perros domésticos. Hubo una gran superposición en la actividad entre el armadillo de nueve bandas y el jaguar; y las cinco especies presa mantuvieron cierto traslape con los perros domésticos, lo que sugiere posibles riesgos de depredación. Este estudio proporciona una comprensión de los factores que afectan la abundancia relativa de especies de presas y la interacción con los depredadores y las personas, pero destaca la necesidad de una evaluación más profunda de la interacción entre los perros domésticos y la fauna silvestre.

Índice

Resumen
Introducción
Artículo: Activity patterns and relative abundance of mammalian prey species of jaguar and puma in a modified landscape in central Belize
Abstract
Methods
Study area
Focal species
Camera trapping
Habitat and anthropogenic factors
Data analysis
Results
Discussion
Literature cited
Tables
Figures
Supplementary information
Conclusiones generales
Literatura citada


14.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Spatial ecology of a large and endangered tropical mammal: the white-lipped peccary in Darién, Panama
Meyer, Ninon France Victoire (autor) ; Moreno, Ricardo (autor) ; Martínez Morales, Miguel Ángel (autor) (-2020) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 páginas 77-93 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
9788-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en español

Large mammals are negatively affected by habitat loss, fragmentation, and hunting. Thus, many of them are nowadays in urgent need of conservation actions to decrease their risk of extinction. Examining space use of large mammals by integrating empirical data and modeling is a primary prerequisite both for basic ecological understanding and for effective conservation planning. In this study, we investigated the basic spatial ecology of the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a keystone ungulate species in the Neotropics. Specifically, we examined the home range and habitat use of the species in the Darién, Panama, which constitutes one of the last remaining strongholds for the species in Mesoamerica. In May and July 2016, we fitted GPS collars on two white-lipped peccaries from different herds and monitored them during 15 months and 1 month. The two herds used an area covered by mature forest and did not venture into disturbed areas during the time we monitored them. Both herds displayed home ranging behavior, and their estimated home range sizes were 58 km2 and 25 km2. The herd that was followed during 15 months showed little difference between seasonal home ranges, suggesting that the forest of Darién provided enough resources throughout the year for the herd to remain in the same area. Based on this study and other research in Panama, we consider that the white-lipped peccary population in Darién is healthy contrasting with many other sites in the country. Management actions need to address both the hunting pressure and the protection of large continuous tracts of undisturbed forests to guarantee the persistence of the species in Panama.


15.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Thoracobombus from Mexico: a description of the male species-specific cephalic labial gland secretions
Brasero, Nicolás ; Vandame, Rémy (coaut.) ; Sagot, Philippe (coaut.) ; Martinet, Baptiste (coaut.) ; Valterová, Irena (coaut.) ; Rasmont, Pierre (coaut.) ;
Contenido en: Apidologie Vol. 50, no. 2 (April 2019), p. 183-194 ISSN: 0044-8435
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The male cephalic labial gland secretions of bumblebees are known to be species-specific semiochemicals. These secretions that are involved in bumblebee pre-mating recognition provide efficient diagnostic characters for species delimitation. The subgenus Thoracobombus is the largest group of bumblebees and is found in the Palearctic, Nearctic, and Neotropical regions. Here, the cephalic labial gland secretion (CLGS) composition of six Mexican Thoracobombus bumblebee species are analyzed: Bombus diligens, B. medius, B. mexicanus, B. pensylvanicus, B. trinominatus, and B. weisi. Our results suggest the presence of two new potential species into the formerly recognized B. weisi as well as one new potential species in the taxon presently identified as B. pensylvanicus. Moreover, the male of B. pensylvanicus, known to congregate at nest sites awaiting the emergence of virgin queens, is characterized by low concentrations of the C16 component. This observation raises the possibility that courtship behavior as well as environmental constraints could affect the role of the male bumblebees’ CLGS.


16.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
White-lipped peccary home-range size in the maya forest of Guatemala and México
Moreira Ramírez, José Fernando (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ; Hidalgo Mihart, Mircea Gabriel (autor) ; Naranjo Piñera, Eduardo Jorge (autor) (1963-) ; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar (autor) ; García Anleu, Rony (autor) ; McNab, Roan (autor) ; Radachowsky, Jeremy (autor) ; Mérida, Melvin (autor) ; Briceño Méndez, Marcos Alberto (autor) ; Ponce Santizo, Gabriela (autora) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 página 21-37 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
9787-30 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari, Link 1795) is a social ungulate that lives in large groups and performs large movements across tropical forest searching for food and water. White-lipped peccaries are an important food source among rural communities. Nevertheless, excessive hunting has caused the extirpation of this species from several areas in the Neotropics where it was previously common. Throughout its range it is considered vulnerable according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, but the Mesoamerican population has decreased in the last 20 years at alarming rates. Using satellite GPS collars, kernel density estimate (KDE), minimum convex polygon (MCP), and the autocorrelated kernel density estimation (AKDE), we estimated the spatial requirements of four white-lipped peccary groups in three sites with different levels of hunting pressure in the Maya Forest of Guatemala and México. Our results showed that the home range estimated in non-hunted sites were smaller than in hunted sites. The 95% KDE home range for non-hunted areas ranged between 40 and 99 km2, substantially smaller than that of the hunted area at 140 km2. Similarly, the 95% AKDE area estimates for non-hunted sites ranged from 62 to 156 km2, while for the hunted site, the 95% AKDE estimate was 312 km2. In non-hunted sites, dry season home ranges were constrained to the close vicinity of water ponds, whereas during the rainy season white-lipped peccary groups were more mobile.

In contrast, the home range was larger in the hunted site during the dry season compared with rainy season. Our results suggest that hunting pressure in the Maya Forest is probably affecting the behavior and ecology of the peccary group, causing them to move through larger areas with lower group size in hunted areas compared to non-hunted areas. We hope that these results encourage more studies focused on estimating white-lipped peccary home-range size in areas with hunting pressure and human activities.


17.
Capítulo de libro
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Why movement ecology matters
Chapman, Colin A. (autor) ; Reyna Hurtado, Rafael Ángel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Movement ecology of neotropical forest mammals: focus on social animals / Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Colin A. Chapman, editors Switzerland, Suiza : Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2019 páginas 1-3 ISBN:978-3-030-03462-7
Bibliotecas: Campeche
Cerrar
SIBE Campeche
59372-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

The scientific discipline of “Movement Ecology” (Nathan et al. 2008) has played an important role in advancing our understanding of almost every ecological and evolutionary process, from nutrient cycling, to habitat selection, to population dynamics and community ecology. Interestingly, it has been almost a quarter of a century ago since Rodgers and Anson (1994) stated that GPS-based animal-location systems would become the standard for habitat selection studies. They were right! The data made available from GPS telemetry (i.e., sequence of GPS locations) quickly boosted the field of “Movement Ecology” (Nathan et al. 2008), and this field was also greatly advanced when the Max Planck Institute of Ornithology developed a free online database, Movebank (movebank.org), that allowed movement data from many, many species to be freely accessed and analysed (millions and millions of travel routes). Further advancements became possible with the development and use of new analytical tools to understand the rules used by the study animals to move (Ropert-Coudert and Wilson 2005; Sengupta et al. 2018).


18.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Age-dependent strategies related to lionfish activities in the Mexican Caribbean
García Rivas, María del Carmen (autora) ; Machkour M'Rabet, Salima (autora) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (autora) ; Schmitter Soto, Juan Jacobo (autor) ; Céréghino, Régis (autor) ; Doneys, Cassiopea (autora) ; St Jean, Nikolas (autor) ; Hénaut, Yann (autor) ;
Contenido en: Environmental Biology of Fishes Vol. 101, no. 4, 122 (April 2018), p. 563–578 ISSN: 0378-1909
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Lionfish are successful invasive predators in the Caribbean region and inhabit a large range of habitats. Our study in the Caribbean has focused on the relationships between the biological characteristics of lionfish particularly their size, their activities and use of those different habitats. In this study, we observed a high number of lionfish individuals, focusing on the behavioural activities and biological traits in relation to different habitats and environmental characteristics. We monitored 793 individuals, recording their activities, biological traits, and habitat characteristics. Our results report that lionfish are not solitary, but frequently form groups for many activities. We provide evidence of differences between lionfish habitat use according to activity, and the size of individual fish. Considering the size is correlated with age, coral reefs appear to be the preferred habitat of older individuals, whereas the youngest lionfish use a diversity of habitats, ranging from mangroves to coral reefs. In addition, this study suggests that predation of lionfish is age-dependent strategy, and depends on time and the tone of the environment. Lionfish do not only use the head-down posture to catch prey but also horizontal and head-up postures. The youngest lionfish hunt mainly in dark areas and during the night while the older fish were observed hunting mostly during the day and in clear areas. These new aspects of lionfish ecology and behaviour are discussed in light of their invasive success.


19.
- Capítulo de libro con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Annual foraging patterns of the maya bee Melipona beecheii (Bennett, 1831) in Quintana Roo, Mexico
Di Trani, Juan Carlos (autor) ; Villanueva Gutiérrez, Rogel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Pot-pollen in stingless bee melittology / Patricia Vit, Silvia R.M. Pedro, David W. Roubik, editors Cham, Switzerland, German : Springer International Publishing AG, 2018 p. 131-138 ISBN:978-3-319-61838-8 :: 978-3-319-61839-5 (eBook)
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a

20.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Associative learning of non-nestmate odor marks between colonies of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana Guérin (Apidae, Meliponini) during foraging
Villanueva Gutiérrez, Rogel (autor) ; Solórzano Gordillo, Erik de Jesús (autor) ; Rojas, Julio C. (autor) ; Cruz López, Leopoldo Caridad (autor) ; Sánchez Guillén, Daniel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Insectes Sociaux Vol. 65, no. 3 (August 2018), p. 393-00 ISSN: 0020-1812
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Stingless bees use chemical signals to communicate nestmates the location of rich food sources. Such information may be intercepted by conspecifics from other colonies. In this study, we investigated if chemical information from non-nestmates can be used to orient foragers of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana to food sources. In the first experiment, foragers were exposed to feeders that were differentially odor-marked by nestmates and non-nestmates, and their preferences for both types of feeders were recorded. In a second experiment, we marked different feeders with mandibular or labial gland extracts of nestmates and non-nestmates. Results from the first experiment indicate that foragers were able to associate odor marks from non-nestmates with rich food sources. In the second experiment, we observed that foragers did not differentiate between the gland extracts of nestmates and those from non-nestmates. We discuss these findings within a behavioral and ecological framework.