Términos relacionados

43 resultados encontrados para: TEMA: Reproducción de insectos
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1.
Libro
Reproductive biology of thrips / T. N. Ananthakrishnan
Ananthakrishnan, T. N. ;
Oak Park, Michigan : Indira Publishing House , 1990
Clasificación: 595.758 / A5
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020011721 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

2.
Capítulo de libro - Artículo de divulgación
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Aspectos de la biología y cría en laboratorio de Zelus renardii (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), un enemigo natural de Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)
Barrera, Juan F. (autor) ; Gómez Ruiz, Jaime (autor) ; Herrera Múñoz, Joel (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Memorias del XXXIII Congreso Nacional de Control Biológico / Rubén Sánchez Martínez, Mario A. Miranda Salcedo, H. Jesús Muñoz Flores, Ma. Blanca Nieves Lara Chávez, Víctor Manuel Coria Alvalos Uruapan, Michoacán, México : Sociedad Mexicana de Control Biológico, 2010 p. 67-80
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a

3.
Artículo
Can the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) reproduce by parthenogenesis?
Barrera, Juan F. ; Gómez Ruiz, Jaime (coaut.) ; Alauzet, C. (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/633.73976 / B3/14
Contenido en: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata Vol. 77, no. 3 (1995), p. 351-354 ISSN: 0013-8703
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
SER000900 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020010428 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

4.
Libro
*En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con la bibliotecaria de SIBE-Tapachula
Cría de insectos plaga y organismos benéficos: ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) / Néstor Bautista Martínez, Hiram Bravo Mojica, Claudio Chavarin Palacio, editores
Bautista Martínez, Néstor (editor) ; Bravo Mojica, Hiram (editor) ; Chavarin Palacio, Claudio (editor) ;
Texcoco, Estado de México, México : Colegio de Posgraduados , c2004
Bibliotecas: Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020013637 (Disponible) , ECO020013636 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Nota: En proceso técnico. Solicítelo con la bibliotecaria de SIBE-Tapachula

5.
Tesis - Licenciatura
Efecto del alimento en la supervivencia y fecundidad de los adultos de la mosca del Mediterráneo Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: tephritidae) / Reyna Elizabeth Bustamante Girón
Bustamante Girón, Reyna Elizabeth ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (asesor) ;
Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, México : Instituto de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, Escuela de Biología , 1992
Clasificación: TC/632.774 / B8
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010016091 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020003811 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1

6.
Tesis - Maestría
Queen dimorphism and functional reproduction in the ponerine ant, Ectatomma ruidum Roger / Alex Cadena Carrión
Cadena Carrión, Alex ; Lachaud, Jean Paul (tutor) ; Pérez Lachaud, Gabriela (asesora) ; Valenzuela González, Jorge Ernesto (asesor) ;
San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, México : El Colegio de la Frontera Sur , 1998
Clasificación: TE/595.796 / C3
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal , Tapachula
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010016101 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Cerrar
SIBE Tapachula
ECO020003776 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 1
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

We report here the first case of queen dimorphism in a ponerine ant species. A total of 550 colonies of the neotropical ponerine ant Ectatomma ruidum, from two natural populations in southeastern Mexico, were investigated for polymorphism and reproductive function within the queen caste. The distribution of different morphological traits (head and thorax widths, and scutum and alitrunk lengths) was shown to be bimodal. Thorax width and head width were significantly isometric for both macro- and microgynes and thorax proportions did not change with the category of the queen. Microgynes appear as an isometric reduction of the normal queens. On average, macrogynes were found to be approximately 20% larger and twice as heavy as microgynes (and up to three times heavier in terms of dry weight). Their wing surface was 72% greater. There was no difference between the two morphs in terms of their capacity to be inseminated and all dealate females present in natural colonies could be considered as true potential queens whatever the class to which they belonged. Ovary size, number of ovarioles per ovary, and number of mature oocytes produced were significantly higher for macrogynes than for microgynes, but small queens were able to function as active egg-layers. However, the number of egg-laying individuals was significantly lower for this form, although egg-laying activity appeared to be independent of queen weight. Despite its markedly reduced reproductive capacity compared to macrogynes, the distribution of the microgyne form of E. ruidum in both populations studied was very broad, reaching one third of all alate and dealate females and extending to one third of all colonies. In 72.2% of the colonies where alate and/or dealate microgynes were present, both forms cooccurred.

Fat content analysis results supported the idea that semi-claustral independent colony founding, typical for this species, would essentially be achieved by macrogynes, while microgynes would be adopted by established colonies. We argue that queen dimorphism in E. ruidum could represent an attractive alternative dispersal strategy for female sexuals. The small females may constitute an important reserve of potential reproductives at a very low energetic cost to the colony; they appear to account for less than 6% of the energetic investment for female sexuals production at the population level. The significantly greater ‘wing surface/body weight’ ratio of microgynes also suggests a greater capacity for dispersion for this form. In part, this may help explain the ecological success of E. ruidum in neotropical zones.


7.
Artículo
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Leg impairments elicit graded and sex-specific demographic responses in the tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens
Carey, James R. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Wang, Jane Ling (autor) ; Wenjing, Yang (autor) ; Molleman, Freerk (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Experimental Gerontology Vol. 44, no. 8 (August 2009), p. 541–545 ISSN: 0531-5565
Nota: Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

This study was concerned with the impact of different levels of artificial impairment (leg amputations) on male and female survival and female reproduction in the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens. We mon-itored the demographic responses in a total of 100 flies of each sex that were maintained individually in 4 4 10 cm cages and subject to 1-of-11 different leg amputations (plus intact control) including cohorts in which either one front, one middle or one rear leg was severed (3 cohorts total), in which two legs were severed in different front–middle–rear combinations (6 cohorts total), or in which the two middle and one additional leg were severed (2 cohorts total). The two main findings were that: (i) although the effects on mortality of impairments were sex-specific, no universal patterns emerged that applied to either sex; and (ii) reproduction occurred in all cohorts of impaired females. Moderately- impaired flies (e.g. amputation of a single middle leg) laid nearly as many eggs in their lifetime as did intact controls. However, severely impaired flies (i.e. 3 legs amputated) laid significantly fewer eggs.


8.
- Artículo con arbitraje
Longevity-fertility trade-offs in the tephritid fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, across dietary-restriction gradients
Carey, James R. (autor) ; Harshman, Lawrence (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Wang, Jane Ling (autor) ; Zhang, Zhen (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Aging Cell Vol. 7, no. 4 (August 2008), p. 470–477 ISSN: 1474-9726
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Although it is widely known that dietary restriction (DR) not only extends the longevity of a wide range of species but also reduces their reproductive output, the interrelationship of DR, longevity-extension and reproduction is not well understood in any organism. Here we address the question: “Under what nutritional conditions do the longevity-enhancing effects resulting from food restriction either counteract, complement or reinforce the mortality costs of reproduction? To answer this question we designed a fine-grained DR study involving 4,800 individuals of the tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens in which we measured sex-specific survival and daily reproduction in females in each of 20 different treatments (sugar:yeast ratios) plus 4 starvation controls. The database generated from this 3-year study consisted of approximately 100,000 life-days for each sex and 750,000 eggs distributed over the reproductive lives of 2,400 females. The fertility and longevity-extending responses were used to create contour maps (X-Y grid) that show the demographic responses (Z-axis) across dietary gradients that range from complete starvation to both ad libitum sugar-only and ad libitum standard diet (3:1 sugar-to-yeast). The topographic perspectives reveal demographic equivalencies along nutritional gradients, differences in the graded responses of males and females, egg production costs that are sensitive to the interaction of food amounts and constituents, and orthogonal contours (equivalencies in longevity or reproduction) representing demographic thresholds related to both caloric content and sugar-yeast ratios. If general, the finding that lifespan and reproductive maxima occur at much different nutritional coordinates poses a major challenge for the use of food restriction (or a mimetic) in humans to improve health and extend longevity in humans.


9.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*Solicítelo con su bibliotecario/a
Biodemography of a long-lived tephritid: reproduction and longevity in a large cohort of female Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens
Carey, James R. (autor) ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (autor) ; Müller, Hans Georg (autor) ; Wang, Jane Ling (autor) ; Senturk, Damla (autora) ; Harshman, Lawrence (autor) ;
Disponible en línea
Contenido en: Experimental Gerontology Vol. 40, no. 10 (October 2005), p. 793–800 ISSN: 0531-5565
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Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

Age of sexual maturity, daily and lifetime reproductive rates, and life span were recorded in a laboratory cohort of Mexican fruit flies consisting of over 1100 females maintained individually. The results revealed that, relative to the medfly, the Mexfly is slower maturing (14 vs 17 days), more fecund (1400 vs 650–1100 eggs/female), and longer lived (50 vs 35 days). The results reinforced the generality of several earlier findings on the medfly including the deceleration of mortality at older ages and the weakness of the correlation between the rate of egg laying at early ages and both subsequent reproduction and remaining longevity. Discussion includes perspectives on the role of artificial selection in shaping the demographic traits of the mass-reared strain of Mexfly used in this study, as well as the overall significance of large scale biodemographic studies in understanding aging and longevity.


10.
- Artículo con arbitraje
*En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Food pulses increase longevity and induce cyclical egg production in Mediterranean fruit flies
Carey, James R. ; Liedo Fernández, Pablo (coaut.) ; Harshman, L. (coaut.) ; Liu, X. (coaut.) ;
Clasificación: AR/632.774 / F6
Contenido en: Functional Ecology Vol. 16, no. 3 (June 2002), p. 313-325 ISSN: 0269-8463
Bibliotecas: San Cristóbal
Cerrar
SIBE San Cristóbal
ECO010018160 (Disponible) , 25898-10 (Disponible)
Disponibles para prestamo: 2
Nota: En hemeroteca, SIBE-San Cristóbal
Resumen en: Inglés |
Resumen en inglés

1. Inasmuch as virtually all studies on mortality and reproduction in insects are conducted under conditions in which food availability is constant, little is known about the demographic response of insects to variable food environments. For example, it is not known if and to what extent the life expectancy of insects subjected to shortages of high-quality food will increase and/or whether this increase is associated with major decreases in lifetime reproduction. 2. Therefore cohorts of 100 individual female medflies were subjected to different sets of conditions of protein availability (interspersed with sugar-only diets) including ad libitum sugar-only (no protein), ad libitum protein and full (protein) diet either every 2nd, 4th, 6th, 11th or 21st day, as well as two lag-treatments (1 day full diet followed by 30 days sugar-only, followed by one of two cyclical treatments). 3. Both life expectancy and lifetime reproduction were strongly affected by specific treatments. Specifically (i) mortality was inversely related to frequency of protein availability whereas lifetime reproduction was directly related; (ii) distinct cycles in reproduction began to appear when food pulse cycles were as short as every 4 days. However, egg-laying peaks and troughs were particularly pronounced in the 10- and 20-day food pulse cycles; (iii) the peak and trough levels were inversely related to cycle length; and (iv) the within-cycle height was independent of cycle length, occurring 4 days after protein food was made available to the cohort whether the cycle length was 5, 10 or 20 days. 4. The results shed new light on the within- and between-cycle and lifetime dynamics of reproduction when insects are subjected to variable food environments and indicate that medfly females track food level very closely.